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    • A Macat Analysis of Christopher R. Browning's Ordinary Men

    • By: James Chappel, Tom Stammers
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Ordinary Men is one of the most influential works on the Holocaust. Before US historian Browning's 1992 book, most Holocaust scholarship focused either on the experience of the victims or on the Nazi political ideology driving the slaughter. Browning investigates the stories of some who carried out acts of extreme violence, those who literally had blood on their hands. Who were they? What were their backgrounds? And how could they end up committing such unspeakable acts?

    • 3 out of 5 stars
    • Not quite what was expected

    • By fzgvkvu on 21-01-19

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's The Social Contract

    • By: James Hill
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Geneva-born thinker Jean-Jacques Rousseau's famous work of political philosophy from 1762 is based on a give-and-take theory of the relation between individual freedom and social order: the social contract that gives the work its name. Rousseau thinks about the issue by starting with what is known as the state of nature, a lawless condition where people are free to do what they like, governed only by their own instinctive sense of justice. People are free, but they are also vulnerable to chaos.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique

    • By: Elizabeth D. Whitaker
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 58 mins
    • Unabridged
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    In 1963's The Feminine Mystique, she identified "the problem that has no name" afflicting women pressured to devote themselves to domestic life. After World War II, society fostered the idea that women wanted different things from men - namely, to run homes and live through the achievements of their husbands and children. In reality, rigid gender roles left housewives frustrated and depressed and caused tensions both in their marriages and in how couples raised their children.

    Regular price: £6.59

    • A Macat Analysis of Eugene Genovese's Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made

    • By: Cheryl Hudson, Eva Namusoke
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Published in 1974, Roll Jordan, Roll is American historian Eugene Genovese's epic study of slavery in the United States in the late 18th and 19th centuries. It provides a nuanced understanding of the relationship between master and slave. Slave owners saw it as their duty to limit slaves' freedoms for their own good, as a father might deal with his children. But Genovese looked beyond this notion of paternalism to suggest the relationship was more complex.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of John Locke's Two Treatises of Government

    • By: Jeremy Kleidosty, Ian Jackson
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Unabridged
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    First available in 1689, John Locke's Two Treatises of Government is considered one of the most important works ever written on the foundations of government. Published anonymously, it argues against the popular idea at the time that monarchs have a God-given right to rule. Instead Locke proposes that sovereignty - supreme authority - ultimately resides with the people.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Michael E. Porter's Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors

    • By: Pádraig Belton
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 2 hrs and 19 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Published in 1980, Michael E. Porter's Competitive Strategy went against the accepted wisdom of the time that said firms should focus on expanding their market share. Porter claimed they should, in fact, analyze the five forces that mold the environment in which they compete: new entrants, substitute products, buyers, suppliers, and industry rivals. Then they could rationally choose one of three "generic strategies" - lowering cost, differentiating their product, or catering to a niche market.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of John Rawls's A Theory of Justice

    • By: Filippo Diongi, Jeremy Kleidosty
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Unabridged
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      4 out of 5 stars 2
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    Issues of human rights and freedoms always inflame passions, and John Rawls's A Theory of Justice will do the same. Published in 1971, it links the idea of social justice to a basic sense of fairness that recognizes human rights and freedoms. Controversially, though, it also accepts differences in the distribution of goods and services - as long as they benefit the worst off in society.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities

    • By: Jason Xidias
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 2 hrs and 8 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Some people think nationhood is as old as civilization itself. But for anthropologist, historian, and political scientist Benedict Anderson, nation and nationalism are products of the communication technology of the era known as the modern age, which began in 1500. After the invention of the printing press around 1440, common local languages gradually replaced Latin as the language of print. Ordinary people could now share ideas of their own.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • An Analysis of Philip Zimbardo's The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil

    • By: Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Born in 1933, Philip Zimbardo is a renowned and controversial American social psychologist who is fascinated by why people can sometimes behave in awful ways. Some psychologists believe people who commit cruelty are innately evil. Zimbardo disagrees. In his 2007 book, The Lucifer Effect, he argued that it is the power of situations around us that can cause otherwise good people to commit "evil", citing many historical examples to illustrate his point.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Jane Jacobs's The Death and Life of Great American Cities

    • By: Ryan Moore
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
    • Unabridged
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    The era after World War II saw America's urban planners treat the lives of city-dwellers with disdain. It spawned a philosophy of urban renewal that valued the efficient movement of cars more than it valued the lives of people, and that wiped out entire neighborhoods dismissed by bureaucrats as slums. Published in 1961, Jane Jacobs's The Death and Life of Great American Cities examines the shortsightedness and failure of this philosophy. The book turns away from strict statistical study and abstract planning theory in favor of observations.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth

    • By: Riley Quinn
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 42 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Published in 1961, the year of Frantz Fanon's death, The Wretched of the Earth is both a powerful analysis of the psychological effects of colonization and a rallying cry for violent uprising and independence. The book rejects colonial assumptions that the people of colonized countries need to be guided by their European colonizers because they are somehow less evolved or civilized. Fanon argues that violence is justified to purge colonialism not just from the countries themselves, but from the very souls of their inhabitants.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Very good overview.

    • By Amazon Customer on 13-02-17

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Sigmund Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams

    • By: William J. Jenkins
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 36 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Sigmund Freud was born in 1856, in Vienna, Austria, and died in London in 1939, but his reputation as "the father of psychoanalysis" lives on. The theories he introduced in his masterwork, The Interpretation of Dreams, revolutionized the treatment of mental illness in the late 19th century. Based on his success in using new techniques he had developed with his patients, and on conclusions he drew from analyzing his own dreams, Freud said that dreams offered a window into the workings of the unconscious mind.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Roland Barthes's Mythologies

    • By: John M. Gómez
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Advertisements for soap. The image of a film star. The sight of a car as beautiful as a goddess. We accept all these common objects and experiences as normal parts of our lives and as timeless and universal as myth. But they are also carrying hidden messages that none of us even suspect, as Barthes demonstrates with a unique analysis of the signs that generate meanings and assumptions we all take for granted. These things have been "taken out of history" so that their hidden cultural meanings can be accepted without question.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

    • By: John Collins
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Unabridged
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    In his 1936 book The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, Keynes argued that traditional economics has misunderstood the causes of unemployment. Employment is not determined by the price of labor; it is directly linked to demand in the economy. Keynes believed market economies are by nature unstable and so require government intervention. Spurred on by the social catastrophe of the Great Depression of the 1930s, Keynes set out to change the way the world thinks about economics.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison

    • By: Meghan Kallman, Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
    • Unabridged
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    How do those in power exercise that power over a state's citizens? French thinker Michel Foucault's 1975 work Discipline and Punish looks to answer this question by investigating the prison system. Foucault does not believe that the modern-day system developed out of reformers' humanitarian concerns. He argues that prison both created and then became part of a bigger system of surveillance that extends throughout society.

    • 1 out of 5 stars
    • This book is a rip off

    • By Lorraine on 25-10-17

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Émile Durkheim's On Suicide

    • By: Robert Easthope
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Sociologist Émile Durkheim's 1897 work On Suicide is a powerful evidence-based study of why people take their own lives. In the late 19th century it was generally accepted that each suicide was an individual phenomenon, caused by such personal factors as grief, loss, and financial problems. But Durkheim felt there were patterns in suicide rates, and believed that a more likely cause of suicide lay in the individual's relationship to society.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of C. Wright Mills's The Sociological Imagination

    • By: Robert Easthope
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
    • Unabridged
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    When American sociologist C. Wright Mills's The Sociological Imagination was first published in 1959, it provoked much hostile reaction. This was understandable: the book was a hard-hitting attack on how sociology was practiced - and on a number of leading sociologists. Mills was a fierce critic of both modern capitalism and Soviet-style authoritarianism, and argued that the sociology profession failed to look at how people's problems are connected to the structures of the society in which they live.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Leon Festinger's A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance

    • By: Camille Morvan, Alexander J. O'Connor
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
    • Unabridged
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    Why do we want to justify our decisions, even if they appear to be irrational? The answer lies in cognitive dissonance, the mental discomfort we experience when we hold two contradictory beliefs at the same time. In A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, first published in 1957, American social psychologist Leon Festinger investigates the problem. Festinger puts forward the idea that we have developed mechanisms to try to deal with the stress brought on by cognitive dissonance.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex

    • By: Rachele Dini
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Unabridged
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    De Beauvoir's book charted the oppression of "the second sex" in terms never before seen in the academic world. Her most startling theory became a rallying cry for the feminist movement: "One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman." She argued that gender identity was shaped by upbringing in a world ruled by men. A leading light in the existentialist movement, de Beauvoir applied the radical philosophy of personal choice and freedom to argue that women were subjugated in every area of life.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Good intro to Simones work

    • By taheya on 29-04-17

    Regular price: £6.79

    • A Macat Analysis of Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan

    • By: Jeremy Kleidosty, Ian Jackson
    • Narrated by: Macat.com
    • Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
    • Unabridged
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    First published in 1651, Leviathan drove important discussions about where kings get their authority to rule and what those kings must, in turn, do for their people. This is known as the "social contract". Thomas Hobbes wrote the book while exiled from his native England following the English Civil War that unseated King Charles I. In the face of England's radical - if temporary - rejection of its monarchy, Hobbes wanted to explain why it was important to have a strong central government, which in his time meant having a sovereign at its head.

    Regular price: £6.59

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