Listen free for 30 days

A Macat Analysis of Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks

Narrated by: Macat.com
Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
2 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

First published in 1948, Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks is an important Marxist work that says we must understand societies both in terms of their economic relationships and their cultural beliefs.

Gramsci wanted to explore why Russia had undergone a socialist revolution in 1917 while other European countries had not. So he developed the concept of hegemony, which is the idea that those who hold power in a society can maintain and use that power because of their own grip on cultural values and economic relationships. Using a combination of force and manipulation, they are able to convince most people that the existing social arrangement is logical and in their best interests. Gramsci says that for a society to truly be transformed, workers need to rise up against two things - the unfair economic system and the ideas and political institutions that sustain it.

Gramsci's analysis of capitalism, economics, and culture has helped explain current historical developments, such as the recent financial crisis that started in 2007.

©2016 Macat Inc (P)2016 Macat Inc

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Performance

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Sort by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Shit analysis of a great set of books

AS above. Lot's of repetition and shallow analysis that adds nothing beyond the superficially obvious.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Chels Alexandra
  • Chels Alexandra
  • 28-12-18

Redundant & uninformative

How many ways can you rephrase, “Gramsci was very important and his writing influenced many people?” This audiobook is short (under 2 hours) but it felt interminable. I’ve read some parts of Gramsci’s notebooks and wanted an overall summary of his ideas, but this audiobook was scant on specifics. The Wikipedia article on Gramsci is more informative.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for SF
  • SF
  • 18-08-19

Repetitive and lacks basic substance

I had hoped to hear a summary of Gramsci's ideas; this did not provide it. It spent a lot of time emphasizing how influential he was -- but not what it was about his ideas that made him influential. It mentioned things he was interested in, but not what he theorized about them. It sounded like it was read from a poorly abridged version because there were certain sentences that were repeated multiple times as if the editor had forgotten they had already included that fact and didn't go back to review the entire final abridged version. It was of some value to learn how he was associated with others of his day and also his personal life, so I gave it 2 stars overall rather than only 1 star. Overall quite disappointing. I hope some of the others in the Macat Analysis series are better.