Listen free for 30 days

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

What makes a winner? Why do some people succeed both in life and in business, and others fail? Why do a few individuals end up supremely powerful, while many remain powerless?

The “winner effect” is a term used in biology to describe how an animal that has won a few fights against weak opponents is much more likely to win later bouts against stronger contenders. As Ian Robertson reveals, it applies to humans, too. Success changes the chemistry of the brain, making you more focused, smarter, more confident, and more aggressive. The effect is as strong as any drug. And the more you win, the more you will go on to win. But the downside is that winning can become physically addictive.

By understanding what the mental and physical changes are that take place in the brain of a “winner”, how they happen, and why they affect some people more than others, Robertson answers the question of why some people attain and then handle success better than others. He explains what makes a winner - or a loser - and how we can use the answers to these questions to understand better the behavior of our business colleagues, family, friends, and ourselves.

©2012 Ian Robertson (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about The Winner Effect

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    23
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    17
  • 4 Stars
    13
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    19
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic book, power changes brain chemistry...

Fascinating read for everyone but especially relevant for people working in hierarchical organisations. Robertson eloquently describes, using a mixture of anecdotes and the latest scientific research, how power fundamentally alters brain chemistry with astounding effects. Holding a position of power can reduce empathy and the ability to listen to feedback and cognitive dissonance can increase these effects. He concludes with the idea that we should consider a leader's need for power and type of power they build carefully and that leaders should be aware of the effects of power on their brains snd cognitive functioning. Increasing the number of women in powerful positions, who are more likely to be motivated towards having a positive impact on others than building egocentric power, may help add balance to organisations and leadership teams.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Incredible Book

In this book there are life changing insights and tips, highly recommend that you give a read

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great book

Very interesting points and great performance, perhaps diverged from certain points too much at times but all still relative.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Nothing you didn't already know

Well narrated. Content is intresting enough to finish the book, but mostly states the obvious.