Listen free for 30 days

Tales from the Greenhills

Narrated by: David Hunsdale
Length: 6 hrs and 33 mins
Categories: Fiction, Historical
5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

During the sizzling hot summer of 1976 in Liverpool, teenager Tommy Dwyer is rapidly approaching adulthood and dealing with the usual coming of age issues: temptation, gang violence, murder, and helping to prevent the flooding of the streets with illegal drugs.

©2018 Terence Patrick Melia (P)2019 Terence Patrick Melia

More from the same

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant an authentic slice of Liverpool life

The narrator is a great counterpoint to the Liverpool accents. Compelling full of dark wicked humour and vivid charecters. TOMMY DWYER is a Liverpool legend


2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Liverpudlian Bildungsroman

As I already appreciate the merits of Terry Melia's novel, this audiobook served as a good opportunity to revisit the story through the many voices of David Hunsdale. Based in the Liverpool of the mid-70s, our hero Tommy Dwyer encounters a range of moral dilemmas and adventures. Whether bringing out the Welsh accents of an extensive third act situated there, or capturing the right tone to evoke the humour, tension or pathos of any particular scene, Hunsdale is an apt choice for narrator. The story itself retains all of the wonderful pacing, well-realised settings and relatable characterisation I remember from reading. There's a fluidity to Melia's prose and this performance does it justice, transitioning between encounters with drug dealers, petty thieves and romantic affairs while developing an impression of Dwyer's world of poverty, aspiration, community and developing sense of justice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful