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Tales from the Greenhills

Narrated by: David Hunsdale
Length: 6 hrs and 33 mins
5.0 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)

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Summary

During the sizzling hot summer of 1976 in Liverpool, teenager Tommy Dwyer is rapidly approaching adulthood and dealing with the usual coming of age issues: temptation, gang violence, murder, and helping to prevent the flooding of the streets with illegal drugs.

©2018 Terence Patrick Melia (P)2019 Terence Patrick Melia

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant an authentic slice of Liverpool life

The narrator is a great counterpoint to the Liverpool accents. Compelling full of dark wicked humour and vivid charecters. TOMMY DWYER is a Liverpool legend

2 people found this helpful

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Forget Bleasdale - Melia is the new master!

Wow!! Although I was too young for the years this book was set in, I feel I now know Liverpool in the late 70s. This is a great audio book and it will make a great movie. The humour works as does the engaging story around Tommy Dwyer and his circle of friends. It captures working class life, love, relationships, violence and the need of a sense of humour to survive. I found I was totally rooting for Tommy all through his "coming of age" journey. The characters are likable and the plot original. It takes six hours so if not a movie this would make a great Netflix original series. The biggest praise I can give this audio book is that whilst I was listening to it, I totally forgot we are in the middle of a Corona virus pandemic.

1 person found this helpful

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covers every aspect of human emotion

mr terry melia has really excelled with this work of fiction truly outstanding considering it's his first book I really enjoyed the liverpudlian humour immensely I can't rate his skill highly enough in words may I suggest any budding film directors give this authors work a chance to appear on the big screen as I'm positive it would become either a drama for tv or adapted into a film very well written terry melia and I hope we don't have to wait to long for a sequel

1 person found this helpful

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1976,memories.

pretty good, took me back to my youth! shame about the accents tho...story was engaging.

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Liverpudlian Bildungsroman

As I already appreciate the merits of Terry Melia's novel, this audiobook served as a good opportunity to revisit the story through the many voices of David Hunsdale. Based in the Liverpool of the mid-70s, our hero Tommy Dwyer encounters a range of moral dilemmas and adventures. Whether bringing out the Welsh accents of an extensive third act situated there, or capturing the right tone to evoke the humour, tension or pathos of any particular scene, Hunsdale is an apt choice for narrator. The story itself retains all of the wonderful pacing, well-realised settings and relatable characterisation I remember from reading. There's a fluidity to Melia's prose and this performance does it justice, transitioning between encounters with drug dealers, petty thieves and romantic affairs while developing an impression of Dwyer's world of poverty, aspiration, community and developing sense of justice.

1 person found this helpful

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An excellent read. Full of great characters.

Terry Melia’s debut novel offers a lovely blend of good and bad, smart and stupid, characters that stem from real life experience in violent 1970’s Liverpool. Being from Northern Ireland and of a similar age, I very much related to the lead character Tommy Dwyer, an intelligent, street-smart young man who needed to escape from the rat-trap in which he was enclosed - before he died within it. Opportunities to do so presented themselves but not before Tommy pushed life and limb to their limits - all the way to an excellent ending when a new life looms but his actual life literally hangs in the balance. Highly recommended.