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All Quiet on the Western Front

Narrated by: Tom Lawrence
Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
5 out of 5 stars (466 ratings)

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Summary

The story is told by a young 'unknown soldier' in the trenches of Flanders during the First World War. Through his eyes we see all the realities of war: under fire, on patrol, waiting in the trenches, at home on leave, and in hospitals and dressing stations. Although there are vividly described incidents which remain in the mind, there is no sense of adventure here, only the feeling of youth betrayed and a deceptively simple indictment of war - of any war - told for a whole generation of victims.

©1929 The estate of the late Paulette Remarque (P)2010 Hachette Digital

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Powerful antiwar novel.

Gosh for such a small book/ 7 hours of Audio, this book packs a powerful punch to your guts and heart. Again one of those books I was told to read at school and I just did not want to. In hindsight I probably would not of understood it. The author takes you through his life as not more than a boy soldier enlisting, to the front lines of WW1, and the physical and mental scars it leaves.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Darren
  • STOCKPORT, UK
  • 05-09-13

Right Down to the Dirt under the Fingernails

Where does All Quiet on the Western Front rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

the very best

What did you like best about this story?

at no point did we suffer the glory, the pomp, or the hollywood endings

Which scene did you most enjoy?

the very end ... I had set myself up for disappointment or a lack of closure, but found it as a reader, which is necessary with such moving and disturbing subject matter

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

yes

Any additional comments?

this book is shock and awe in the face for the glory hunters, the fantasists and the myth-makers ... a breath-taking truth cutter ... why was this not on my school curriculum?

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Jonathan
  • BURY ST. EDMUNDS, United Kingdom
  • 23-05-13

Powerful and Moving Book, very well read.

A book that demonstrates the effects of war on a person from the view of a world war one soldier. It reveals war in its terror and shows how people learn to live with it as best they can. The futility of WW1 is explored and it has many parts that leave you with the aching sorrow of loss. Not the most light hearted of books but one that should not be missed.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Joseph
  • Rochdale, UK
  • 08-05-15

Sympathetically told story of the horrors of WW1

A young man goes to war full of idealism and love for his country.

He tells the story of his horrible experiences without any gung-ho or glamorisation as he slowly loses his regimental mates to the war.

This is a classic and I have "read" it now for the first time although it should be required reading for all.

As a follow-up, look up the author's name in an online encyclopaedia and see just what the Nazis thought of him!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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A view from the other side

What made the experience of listening to All Quiet on the Western Front the most enjoyable?

The voice of the young man reading this fitted the character perfectly

What did you like best about this story?

It would be hard to say what one liked in a book basically about the horrors of war but what did come through was the strong feeling of comradeship among the young soldiers.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The most likeable scene was the feast with duck on the menu,a temporary escape from the sheer hell of the trenches.The scenes set in a Catholic hospital although horrifying in parts were also fascinating.Towards the end of the novel the death of Pauls friend was intensely moving.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I prefer to take my time & savour a good novel & this was a great novel.

Any additional comments?

This should be on the curriculum of every school to teach the young the horror & futility of war.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Well Written war time story

What made the experience of listening to All Quiet on the Western Front the most enjoyable?

Very lifelike and transports you back in time and the emotion runs very high and charged.

What other book might you compare All Quiet on the Western Front to, and why?

Very much so as my son is studying the world wars of this period and Flaunders fields (John Mcrae) ties in to the poetry in English as well as the History and Geography in this subject that he is studying.

Have you listened to any of Tom Lawrence’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Yes by writing in a very gruelling manner and genuine manner. War is shown as it should be not through rose coloured tinted glasses. The language also used shows the fear of the soldiers and the trenchlife became an existence.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No in chapters per night

Any additional comments?

A very powerful book in the affairs of a private in war

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Perfect Narration

Loved the film, wanted to read the book but haven't got the time. Narration was perfect and Tom Lawrence very much understands what the book is trying to portrait. finished it in a weekend.

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A difficult,raw listen

A harrowing journey through the front lines of a near-forgotten war.The narrator's tone captured perfectly the mood of combat. Well worth a listen if you want to know the gritty,muddled mind of a soldier in a battle outside of his control.

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good listen and good story

loved it! and a good narrator giving it a good feel. would absolute read this again

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War that is amazing depressing and disgraceful

German perspective of the front. Amazing classic, with the sour taste of wartime feeling.
truly disturbing in places how normal life carries on regardless...

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  • Jefferson
  • 24-08-13

This Is Where I Belong

Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front is beautiful, moving, and appalling, setting forth so clearly and cogently so many awful truths about war, patriotism, youth, maturity, human nature, love, and life. It is as apt today as it was when it was written, and despite being set in the First World War applies to any war fought before or after.

Remarque's purpose: "To give an account of a generation destroyed by the war." If not directly maiming and killing young soldiers, war--no adventure--severs their psychological connections to life, turning them into kill or be killed animals and abandoned children who are also old men. The real enemy is not the French (or any country) but death and war itself, as well, perhaps, as the "morally bankrupt" authority figures (politicians, teachers, preachers, parents, and newspapers) who should know better but who mismanage everything so as to let war happen and then brainwash or browbeat innocent young men full of life into entering the war. The truth of war, Paul says, is found in military hospitals, in which are found examples of every possible way to harm a human body, and which render pointless all human thoughts, words, and deeds.

The novel begins in medias res with the first person narrator Paul Baumer telling in present tense how he and his young-old veteran friends in Company B are ecstatic because their company of 150 men was just unexpectedly attacked and lost 70 men, so that the food and tobacco that had been ordered for 150 will now go to only 80, so they will finally get enough to eat. "Because of that, everything is new and full of life, the red poppies, the good food, the cigarettes, the summer breeze." They then visit one of their friends who is dying from an infected wound. "It's still him, but it isn't really him anymore. His image has faded, become blurred, like a photographic plate that has had too many copies made from it. Even his voice sounds like ashes." Another friend really wants to get the dying guy's boots, and this is perfectly natural. In the second chapter Paul flashbacks to how the boys were persuaded to volunteer by their schoolmaster (a man they now scorn), and how they were bullied through basic training by a sadistic drill corporal till they'd become hard and suspicious.

Through Paul, Remarque vividly depicts trench warfare: latrines, rations, and cigarettes; hunger and thirst; "corpse rats" and lice; dysentery, influenza, and typhus; barbed wire, trenches, dugouts, and craters; revolvers, rifles, machine guns, tracer bullets, bayonets, trench spades, flame throwers, trench mortars, rockets, shells, daisy cutters, shrapnel, hand grenades, and gas; observation balloons, airplanes, trucks, trains, and tanks; continuous fire, defensive fire, and curtain fire; attacks and counter-attacks back and forth across the lunar no-man's land; shattered bones, fragments of flesh, decapitations, disembowelings, torn off faces, blown off limbs, bodies blown out of uniforms and into trees, blue-faced gas corpses, and hissing and belching corpses. All of that becomes more and more hellish as the war drags on and the German supplies and troops dwindle.

Paul has a poet's mind for metaphor. Sitting in their dugout in the trenches is like "Sitting in our own grave waiting to be buried," or "as if we were sitting inside a massive echoing metal boiler that is being pounded on every side." Paul and his friends watch fountains of mud and iron rising up all around them, and mist rising up from the shell holes "like ghostly secrets." He says, "No man's land is outside us and inside us." And "Our hands are earth, our bodies mud, and our eyes puddles of rain." Paul's memories from before the war are dangerous, because to dwell in their lost quietness would render him unable to deal with the reality of the present moment at the front. "We are dead. Our memories come to haunt us. We have been consumed by the fires of reality." Here and there he utters brief lyrical and poignant descriptions: "The wind plays with our hair, and with our words and our thoughts." And "Days are like angels in blue and gold, untouchable."

The only good thing about the war (and it's a very sad good thing) is the bonding it forges between Paul and his friends, comrades in arms. At one point Paul and his mentor Kat are eating a goose they've organized, and Paul feels that "We are brothers… two tiny sparks of life; outside there is just the night, and all around us, death." When he gets two weeks of leave, he is painfully uncomfortable at home, feeling no point of contact with his pre-war self or with his family members or former teachers, etc., because they have not the remotest conception of the front. When he returns to his friends at the front he thinks a devastating truth: "This is where I belong."

This is Brian Murdoch's 1994 translation, not A. W. Wheen's 1929 one. Here is a brief comparison:

Murdoch: "The front is a cage, and you have to wait nervously in it for whatever will happen to you."

Wheen: "The front is a cage in which we must await fearfully whatever may happen."

Tom Lawrence reads Murdoch's translation so well--his youthful, British voice, perfect clarity and pacing, and sensitive and sad manner all so appealing--that I found it fine.

People who are fascinated by vivid accounts of the horror of war, or who are interested in World War I as seen from the German point of view, or who like well-written, beautiful, awful, and sad books should read All Quiet on the Western Front.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Artyomca
  • 16-07-19

The lost generation

This book describes an experience of a young german soldier in WW1, through numerous really vivid and common situations which could belong to any other private soldier at that war.

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  • H. Eilouti
  • 03-03-19

An amazing roller coaster

This is one of the greatest books I’ve ever read or listened to by far. The story is amazing and heart breaking, while staying funny at times, and overall a very deep read. Would highly recommend this book to ANYONE, no matter your preferences l. This book truly puts war in a new perspective, one that everyone should understand

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  • Micha
  • 29-01-19

Listened to this driving from Moab to Colorado Spr

Remarque captures the meaningless of WW1 and the difference between civilian and combatant life expertly.
The narrator is doing a great job and it has been a pleasure to listen to this book.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 31-12-18

A must read/listen for everyone

I don't think any positive words would fit this book. The performance is good and it is well written, but the subject matter itself so tears at your soul that it is hard to consider those.

It is important that you complete this. While there are many stories of the first world war, this is one of the best. Consider while you listen that this is not just this story but that the war was full of stories like this, all over the front and on both sides.

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  • nailo
  • 12-06-18

Amazing to hear

I really sympathized with the storyteller. His story was touching and really got me into his head and heart. Not a happy book to say the least, but still wonderful

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  • Nuggets
  • 01-01-18

Second war book

This is the second war related book that I have read and am not regretting it. It simultaneously highlights the everyday life as well as the combat conditions of the soldiers.

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  • Frank Turley
  • 14-06-17

I am so glad I listened to this book.

It is one of the best books I have read. the translation is also excellent.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Flurin
  • 17-05-17

Good book

I would have preferred to have a more germanic voice but besides that, brilliant audiobook

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Alyssa
  • 27-02-17

Not the America Translation

I bought this book to read along with, but the wording is absolutely different. If I had known I wouldn't have bought it, now I have to buy the other version.