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National Populism

The Revolt Against Liberal Democracy (A Pelican Book)
Narrated by: Matthew Goodwin
Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
Categories: Non-fiction, Politics
4.5 out of 5 stars (80 ratings)

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Summary

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of National Populism: The Revolt Against Liberal Democracy, a Pelican Book, written by Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin and read by Matthew Goodwin.  

A crucial new guide to one of the most urgent political phenomena of our time: the rise of national populism. 

Across the West, there is a rising tide of people who feel excluded, alienated from mainstream politics and increasingly hostile towards minorities, immigrants and neoliberal economics. Many of these voters are turning to national populist movements, which have begun to change the face of Western liberal democracy, from the United States to France, Austria to the UK.  

This radical turn, we are told, is a last howl of rage from an aging electorate on the verge of extinction. Their leaders are fascistic and their politics antidemocratic, their existence a sideshow to liberal democracy.  

But this version of events, as Roger Eatwell and Matthew Goodwin show, could not be further from the truth.  

Written by two of the foremost experts on fascism and the rise of national populism, this lucid and deeply researched audiobook is a vital guide to our transformed political landscape. Challenging conventional wisdoms, Eatwell and Goodwin make a compelling case for serious, respectful engagement with the supporters and ideas of national populism - not least because it is a tide that won't be stemmed anytime soon.

©2019 Matthew Goodwin and Roger Eatwell (P)2019 Penguin Books Ltd

What members say

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Superb book

Incisive, well argued and much needed exposition of the underlying reasons for the revolt against liberal democratic governments. Worth reading, whoever you vote for.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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great content, monotone reader

Very interesting and thought provoking content, but the reader is quite monotone. Still worth listening do but I found myself phasing out quite often.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Great content, woeful narration

The content of this book was great: eye-opening, educational and an intelligent fact-led argument...

...but, whilst I do respect Audible's commitment to allowing the authors to narrate their own works, Goodwin really wasn't a good choice here. He was monotonous to the point that I would have just preferred Siri to have read it. I don't need Ian McKellen to narrate all my books, but by heck, a morsel of dynamism and modulation would have been nice.

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Mindset changing

Challenged my preconceptions. Well argued rational, supported by evidence, to show the development of populism has been growing for many years. The increasing distrust and experiences of the population with the political classes for the reasons presented sets up a major challenge to our current political system

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Goodwin and Eatwell see some simple realities

Goodwin and Eatwell see some simple realities that are lost on most social commentators. The majority of journalists and academics should read this book to free themselves of their comforting illusions.

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A timely dose of truth for the neo-liberal elites

An objective and honest appraisal of the current political turmoil engulfing the West. Whilst the narration is somewhat flat, the content is well crafted and speaks a number of uncomfortable truths which are largely dismissed by the current political establishment.

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Hugely informative book but narration isn’t great

Brilliant book but I found the narration very monotone and difficult to follow. Informative though

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Great book, somewhat spoiled by the narrator

This was a very enjoyable book but it was somewhat let down by the monotonal voice of the narrator/author, which was quite distractingly dull. Would have been much better read by a professional actor.

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Outstanding

interesting breakdown and analysis for the populist explosion of recent time but more so in recognition of the longer and broader trends that brought us here.

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Great book - flat read

A very thought provoking book, which seems very well researched. Unfortunately they should have paid someone to read it. Matthew is extreamly monotone

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Profile Image for Armand Jarri
  • Armand Jarri
  • 23-02-19

Very repetitive

The book read like an ok graduate thesis. Very repetitive. The author keeps saying the same thing in every chapter. Seems that he is saying the obvious. The book offers little if any examination of the differences between national populist movements in Europe at the moment. Worst of all is the extremely boring amd monotonous reading.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful