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Single & Single Audiobook

Single & Single

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Publisher's Summary

A corporate lawyer from the House of Single & Single is shot dead on a Turkish hillside for crimes that he does not understand. A children’s entertainer in Devon is hauled to his local bank late at night to explain a monumental influx of cash. A Russian freighter is arrested in the Black Sea....

The logical connection of these events and more is one of the many pleasures of this story of love, deceit, family and the triumph of humanity.

©2010 David Cornwell (P)2014 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (165 )
5 star
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4.2 (126 )
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4.5 (127 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Peter Bristol, United Kingdom 21/06/2011
    Peter Bristol, United Kingdom 21/06/2011 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Perfect voice for the master's stories"

    John Le Carre writes quite amazing stories - about flawed innocents with pure intentions caught up in the mendacities of the real word. There is something about Michael Jayston's voice, the slightly jaded world-weariness, that makes it quite the perfect vehicle for Le Carre's writing.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kate Co GalwayIreland 21/06/2010
    Kate Co GalwayIreland 21/06/2010
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    "A good listen"

    Le Carre rarely disappoints, and this one, while not one of his very best, is still a gripping yarn, with great characters and chilling realism. Michael Jayston is the perfect reader for his books, and brings the characters alive without interfering with the narrative.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Hurtlejolt Oxford, UK 03/08/2017
    Hurtlejolt Oxford, UK 03/08/2017 Member Since 2011
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    "A great book, but complex and hard to follow."
    Would you consider the audio edition of Single & Single to be better than the print version?

    It is for me, I like Michael Jayston's narration.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Brock, very like a less cultured Smiley.


    Which character – as performed by Michael Jayston – was your favourite?

    Brock


    Any additional comments?

    Le Carre's plots are always complex, but I think I found this book harder to follow than most.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    peter Szentendre, Hungary 01/11/2012
    peter Szentendre, Hungary 01/11/2012
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    "single but not alone"

    a fine work. was a good read, even though le Caree has explored his preoccupation of the father&son mire previously and i think more successfully in some of his other novels. M. Jayston, the resident narrator of this author, just carries on, delivers the goods and getting finer with age.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    L Swansea, United Kingdom 01/09/2013
    L Swansea, United Kingdom 01/09/2013 Member Since 2013
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    "Fantastic"

    This put me in mind of "A perfect spy" ~ one of my favourites. It was delicious to slip into le Carre's world again. The Balloon man is an inspired creation.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    DT 05/10/2015
    DT 05/10/2015 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A very angry book"
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    Yes - see below


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Brock - less mannered than the others, though still a type and probably a descendant of George Smiley.


    Have you listened to any of Michael Jayston’s other performances? How does this one compare?

    Yes - just as good as the others.


    Do you think Single & Single needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    It already has follow-ups.


    Any additional comments?

    Oliver Single, the hero of John Le Carré’s fourth post-Cold War novel, seems, if anything, more troubled by internal demons than George Smiley, though probably not Alec Leamas. He is damaged by disillusion as he is drawn into Single & Single and suffers, as do many of Le Carré’s heroes, from his public school up-bringing. Oliver generates in himself and many readers, I expect, considerable outrage and without even the ambiguous moral high ground of Western values that Le Carré occasionally defends in his earlier fiction. He finds himself a stranger in his own country and turns double-agent within his father’s business empire. Single & Single is in the business of investment and asset and portfolio management in the world of holding companies, usually off-shore and sometimes owned by foundations. It is the business of money and of dirty traders with smart addresses. “Everyone’s a trader”, someone remarks.

    Le Carré is remarkably good at “showing”, rather than “telling”, to use Henry James’s distinction, and the interconnections between people, places, events, and activities are only bit-by-bit revealed. The significance of the shocking opening on a very hot Turkish hillside is left in front of the reader until, in time, its significance becomes apparent. There is also a good deal of narrative movement from past to present in Oliver’s mind, the former paradoxically signaled by a switch to the present tense. This device works very effectively, both in plot terms and as a way to reveal the struggles within Oliver.

    Critics and reviewers often make a sound case for Le Carré’ transcending the spy-novel and the variants upon it that he, more than anyone, has gone on to develop since the Berlin Wall came down. There is real despair in his fiction and his narrative techniques are very accomplished and go well beyond generic norms. And, for a while, his characterization was quite subtle, as an interior life intersected with the protocols and plots of the thriller. However, at some point – probably before “Single and Single” – Le Carré’s characterization becomes mannered and over-formulaic, in that motifs from one novel are transferred without much modification into another novel. The hero’s decency is evident when he “pads” around a room like a big friendly bear; he has to “kill” or otherwise deal with a father or father-figure; and he is desperately sentimental about certain close relatives or friends. Oliver’s feelings for his daughter, Carmen, rise in pitch the more irresponsible he is as a father. Sentimentality is often a sign that a character wants to have his cake even as he eats it. When the main character slips into caricature (admittedly, a caricature of Le Carré’s own inimical making), other characters suffer as well and we know who someone is the moment he or she speaks. Subject and verb get dropped from too many sentences. Villains speak in an extraordinary mix of versions of English. These are balanced by honourable foreigners who have their own odd way of speaking. Women are abandoned wives or brave but rather physically-awkward comrades who abandon themselves to the foolishness of the hero (in this novel, a Customs Officer called Aggy) or landladies who hold the fort for the hero.

    Quite possibly, Le Carré is so incensed by post-Cold War activities and by Blair- and post-Blair Britain, in particular, that he is looking for the most direct way to castigate it while still writing fiction. “Single & Single” is a justifiably angry book of markets being flooded by awful products with the direct or indirect involvement of the establishment.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Geoff 01/10/2017
    Geoff 01/10/2017 Member Since 2015
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    "Another tale from the master"

    A fascinating tale surrounding post communism in the former USSR – and vivid portraits of the men who grew rich overnight and ruthlessly held onto that power, taking no prisoners.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ian Jackson Leighton Buzzard 04/08/2017
    Ian Jackson Leighton Buzzard 04/08/2017 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
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    "the le carré star continues to shine brightly"

    Still written in the style of a complex spy story but bringing something fresh to the story line. Colourful descriptive detail of people, places and events throughout the whole book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Saul Bellow 13/01/2017
    Saul Bellow 13/01/2017 Member Since 2016
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    "Classic le Carre, brilliantly narrated. Wonderful."

    Le Carre's sweeping disquisition on corruption is deeply satisfying. From the Liverpool docks to the Caucasian badlands, this novel is a masterclass on the darker sides of global trade and the people who facilitate it. Mr Jayston's narrative is a joy - wonderful characterisation and pacing, a tour de force. Highly recommended

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Allan Vaughan 18/10/2016
    Allan Vaughan 18/10/2016 Member Since 2017
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    "The next Night Manager?"

    Hopefully TV will pick up this novel for TV - it has all the possibilities of being as good as the Night Manager

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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