Showing results by author "Scientific American"

Categories

All Categories

220 results
Sort by
    • Why Migraines Strike

    • Scientific American
    • By: David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 22 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8

    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Hooked from the First Cigarette

    • Scientific American
    • By: Joseph R. DiFranza, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 20 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    New findings reveal that cigarette addiction can arise astonishingly fast. But the research could lead to therapies that make quitting easier.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • How to Build a Time Machine

    • Scientific American
    • By: Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 14 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 15
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 11
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 11

    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • time travel

    • By Mohammed on 12-02-16

    Regular price: £1.89

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3.5 out of 5 stars 12
    • Performance
      3.5 out of 5 stars 9
    • Story
      3.5 out of 5 stars 9

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Must-listen material

    • By Dave Kinsella on 04-08-15

    Regular price: £1.59

    • Scientific American, March 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The cover story this month uncovers the earliest evidence of human influence on the global climate. Also, take a look at how scientists are using computer-simulated social interactions to study the prevention of disease outbreaks. Then, clear up some of the biggest misconceptions about the Big Bang that even some astronomers themselves perpetuate. Plus, take an in-depth look at Nikola Tesla, inventor of the alternating current, and check up on the improving market viability of the hydrogen-powered car.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • Scientific American, February 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 53 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this February 2005 edition of Scientific American: The most startling anthropological discovery of the year, a dwarf species of hominid living on the Indonesian islands as recently as 13,000 years ago; the hunt for better world wide web searches; the science behind the process of remembering; tiny ultra-cold particles produced by microchips could revolutionize technology; and more.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Is Your Food Contaminated?

    • Scientific American
    • By: Mark Fischetti, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 17 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 1

    Terrorism, an increase in imports, and more centralized production are making new contamination-detection technologies more appealing to implement. Learn more in this article, "Is Your Food Contaminated?", from the September 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, May 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Neuromorphic chips aim to mimic the nervous system's wiring to create technology that could restore human vision; lightning continues to amaze researchers with its unexpected complexity; physical differences in the brains of men and women may merit sex-specific treatments for psychiatric disorders; a rarely-discussed disease can cause blindness and heart problems; and physicists seek to create black holes in the comfort of their own laboratories.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, April 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 1

    Scientists who have long wondered why the polarity of the Earth's magnetic field occasionally reverses may finally have their answer. Also, a look at how the online industry is stepping up its measures to thwart electronic junk mail, a new way of approaching long-term problems that focuses on flexibility rather than cost-benefit analysis; and surprising similarities between humans and animals when it comes to dealing with personal economics.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Beyond Einstein

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 55 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This special edition of Scientific American features seven stories about Albert Einstein and his theories. The articles examine how Einstein's theories changed the world and continue to influence modern science and technology.

    Regular price: £5.59

    • Scientific American, December 2016

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 56 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "2016 World Changing Ideas": 10 big advances with the potential to solve problems and improve life for all of us. "Solar System Smashup": Our neighborhood of planets was not created slowly, as scientists once thought, but in a speedy blur of high-energy crashes, destruction and rebuilding. "HIV's Achilles Heel": Investigators hope that a three-part protein that mimics a key part of HIV particularly well could lead to a long-awaited vaccine.

    Regular price: £4.99

    • Human Evolution

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 3 hrs and 9 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    Regular price: £5.79

    • The Science of Intuition

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 44 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains seven fascinating articles. First, discover the science behind your gut instinct. You'll also learn how antidepressants designed for adults may be altering the brains of children. You'll hear about a growing body of research that's showing how working in groups can systematically enhance performance. There's also news about the connection between abnormal sleep patterns and disease, and a report on the science of speech.

    Regular price: £3.79

    • Dinosaurs

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 2 hrs and 55 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      5 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    First, hear about fish-shaped reptiles that thrived in the oceans while dinosaurs ruled the land. Then, learn about the evolutionary history of whales, the mammals that conquered the seas. The most famous of all dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus Rex, gets a fresh look as scientists re-examine fossil evidence for clues as to the tyrannosaur¿s actual behavior. Also, learn about some ancient Australian marsupials that were as ferocious as they were bizarre. Then, "Which Came First, the Feather or the Bird?", and more.

    Regular price: £5.59

    • Creativity

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American Mind
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 2
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The cover story in this issue explains how creativity and brilliance arises in all of us. Then, we'll take a look at the latest theories behind the experience commonly known as 'deja-vu'. Also, we'll learn about a mental breakdown that causes apathy so extreme it could become deadly, as well as Capgras syndrome, a perception disorder that causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by extraterrestrial body doubles.

    Regular price: £5.59

    • July 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 24 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Memory's Intricate Web": A technical revolution provides insight into how the brain links memories. "Black Holes from the Beginning of Time": A hidden population of black holes born less than one second after the big bang could solve the mystery of dark matter. "How Cities Could Save Us": Urban areas can improve the planet as well as people's lives if we design them to be much more resourceful. "Operation: Diabetes": Surgery that shortens intestines gets rid of the illness, and new evidence shows the gut – not simply insulin – may be responsible.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • September 2017

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 17 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this issue: "Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths": The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny. "Is there a 'Female' Brain?": The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity. "When Sex and Gender Collide": Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. "Not Just for Men": Researchers must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide better treatments.

    Regular price: £6.59

    • Sex and the Secret Nerve

    • Scientific American Mind
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 45 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This edition of Scientific American Mind contains six fascinating articles on topics that deal with human behavior. You'll hear about the future of online dating, the continuing mystery of acupuncture, what home really means, how to be happy, and why some people are obsessed with...garbage.

    Regular price: £3.89

    • Scientific American, September 2014

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 10 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "The New Science of Human Origins": Scientists have had to revise virtually every chapter of the human story. "Welcome to the Family": The latest molecular analyses and fossil finds suggest that the story of human evolution is far more complex—and more interesting—than anyone imagined. "Powers of Two": Monogamy helped humans evolve into the big-brained world conquerors they are today. "Still Evolving": For 30,000 years our species has been changing remarkably quickly – and we're not done yet.

    Regular price: £4.99

    • The Scientific American Brave New Brain

    • By: Judith Horstman, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Susan Ericksen
    • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact.

    Regular price: £18.79

Show titles per page
  • 1
  • 2
  • ...
  • 11