Showing results by author "Scientific American"

Categories

All Categories

222 results
Sort by
    • Why Migraines Strike

    • Scientific American
    • By: David W. Dodick, J. Jay Gargus, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 22 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8
    • Story
      4.5 out of 5 stars 8

    Biologists have solved the mystery of one of our most misunderstood, poorly recognized, and inadequately treated medical disorders. This article was published in the August 2008 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Time

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This special edition of Scientific American contains six articles full of remarkable insights into the inner workings of your body and your mind. How does your biological clock keep you running? How does your brain make chronological sense of your experiences and memories? You'll also hear how scientists are striving to understand time, from its very origins to the possibility of a time machine. And, you'll get a fascinating history of the timepiece.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • The Science of Persuasion

    • Scientific American
    • By: Robert Cialdini, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 21 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4 out of 5 stars 13
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 10
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 10

    From the pages of Scientific American magazine: "The Science of Persuasion" reveals how sales people and politicians, as well as friends and family, get others to agree to what they want.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • Must-listen material

    • By Dave Kinsella on 04-08-15

    Regular price: £1.79

    • How to Build a Time Machine

    • Scientific American
    • By: Paul Davies, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 14 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      4.5 out of 5 stars 17
    • Performance
      4.5 out of 5 stars 13
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 13

    It goes without saying that building a time machine wouldn't be easy. But according to author Paul Davies, it might actually be possible.

    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • time travel

    • By Mohammed on 12-02-16

    Regular price: £1.89

    • Hooked from the First Cigarette

    • Scientific American
    • By: Joseph R. DiFranza, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 20 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    New findings reveal that cigarette addiction can arise astonishingly fast. But the research could lead to therapies that make quitting easier.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, March 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 47 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The cover story this month uncovers the earliest evidence of human influence on the global climate. Also, take a look at how scientists are using computer-simulated social interactions to study the prevention of disease outbreaks. Then, clear up some of the biggest misconceptions about the Big Bang that even some astronomers themselves perpetuate. Plus, take an in-depth look at Nikola Tesla, inventor of the alternating current, and check up on the improving market viability of the hydrogen-powered car.

    Regular price: £6.79

    • Scientific American, April 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      4 out of 5 stars 1

    Scientists who have long wondered why the polarity of the Earth's magnetic field occasionally reverses may finally have their answer. Also, a look at how the online industry is stepping up its measures to thwart electronic junk mail, a new way of approaching long-term problems that focuses on flexibility rather than cost-benefit analysis; and surprising similarities between humans and animals when it comes to dealing with personal economics.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, February 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 53 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In this February 2005 edition of Scientific American: The most startling anthropological discovery of the year, a dwarf species of hominid living on the Indonesian islands as recently as 13,000 years ago; the hunt for better world wide web searches; the science behind the process of remembering; tiny ultra-cold particles produced by microchips could revolutionize technology; and more.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Is Your Food Contaminated?

    • Scientific American
    • By: Mark Fischetti, Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 17 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      3 out of 5 stars 1
    • Performance
      4 out of 5 stars 1
    • Story
      3 out of 5 stars 1

    Terrorism, an increase in imports, and more centralized production are making new contamination-detection technologies more appealing to implement. Learn more in this article, "Is Your Food Contaminated?", from the September 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, May 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 48 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Neuromorphic chips aim to mimic the nervous system's wiring to create technology that could restore human vision; lightning continues to amaze researchers with its unexpected complexity; physical differences in the brains of men and women may merit sex-specific treatments for psychiatric disorders; a rarely-discussed disease can cause blindness and heart problems; and physicists seek to create black holes in the comfort of their own laboratories.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, February 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    There are five articles in this edition: "The Discovery Machine", "The Coming Revolution in Particle Physics", "Building the Next Generation Collider", "The Unquiet Ice", and "RFID Powder".

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, June 2005

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 29 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The cover story this month takes a look at suspended animation, and how close we are to making it a reality. Plus, a dissenting look at the side-effects of obesity, the ancient origins of the modern intellect, and chemical companies that attempt to evade government regulations by fabricating scientific uncertainty.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, April 2008

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 58 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    "The Color of Plants on Other Worlds", "The Doping Dilemma", "Detecting Nuclear Smuggling", "Regrowing Human Limbs", "Regrowing Human Limbs", and "Carbon Wonderland".

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, February 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Sal Giangrasso
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

     Listen to the February 2007 edition of Scientific American.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, November 2007

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Mark Moran
    • Length: 1 hr and 53 mins
    • Abridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    There are five articles in this issue: "A Need For New Warheads?", "The Great Roller Coaster Ride", "Cell Defenses and The Sunshine Victim", "Brilliant Displays", and "The Science of Doing Good".

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, August 2006

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: Scientific American
    • Length: 1 hr and 27 mins
    • Unabridged
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In the cover story, we'll hear the secrets of the expert mind, and find out how to become good at anything. Also, we'll take a look at the development of a new hypersonic jet engine for space planes, learn about the evolution of mountains, and hear about the ecological relationship between predators, prey, and the forests in which they live.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, June 2004

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    In nature, DNA serves as an all-important informational molecule, but, as reporter Nadrian Seeman explains in this month's cover story, "Nanotechnology and the Double Helix", DNA can also be a versatile component for making fantastically small devices. Also in this edition of Scientific American for June 2004: the near-term possibilities of using pillbox sized computers armed with sensors to connect the cyberworld with the real one, the possibility of developing human stem cell therapies, and more.

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Scientific American, September 2000

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 34 mins
    • Original Recording
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    The dazzling feats of Olympic and professional athletes depend on top-notch performance by their powerfully conditioned muscles. But conditioning can only go so far; recent research suggests that on a biological level, some athletes really are born, not made. Future genetic breakthroughs could change even that. This month's cover story, "Muscles and Genes," addresses the possibilities. Subscribe to this Audible exclusive!

    Regular price: £0.00

    • Human Evolution

    • Scientific American Special Edition
    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 3 hrs and 7 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    Reading the cracked brown fragments of fossils and sequences of DNA, scientists have found clues that the story of human origins has more convolutions than previously thought. The account of our shared human heritage now includes more controversial plot twists and mysteries. Was the remarkable seven-million-year-old skull found in July 2002 in Chad really one of our first forebears, or a distant dead-end cousin with precociously evolved features?

    Regular price: £5.79

    • Scientific American, July 2004

    • By: Scientific American
    • Narrated by: uncredited
    • Length: 1 hr and 26 mins
    • Highlights
    • Overall
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Performance
      0 out of 5 stars 0
    • Story
      0 out of 5 stars 0

    This month's cover story asks the questions "Will Gene Doping change the nature of Sports?" Also in this July 2004 issue of Scientific American: new tests for mad cow disease offer hope for a treatment; the extraordinary deaths of other ordinary stars; the future of hard drives; and more.

    Regular price: £0.00

Show titles per page
  • 1
  • 2
  • ...
  • 12