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Summary

The Sunday Times best seller

We are at a pivotal moment in the fight against climate change - with the ultimate opportunity to reassess what society values and how we can better respond to future crises.

This book asks why it is that the things we value most - from the environment to frontline workers to keeping children well fed and educated - are so often neglected by the market.

In Value(s), one of the great global thinkers of our time examines how what we value has become misaligned and how we can rethink and rebuild before it is too late.

Drawing on a truly international perspective, this book offers a blueprint for how we can channel the dynamism of the market to transform intractable global problems into opportunities. And in so doing build a better world for all.

©2021 Mark Carney (P)2021 HarperCollins Publishers Limited

Critic reviews

"A radical book that speaks out accessibly as to how we get everyone involved in solving our problems. And this is what we need: 50 Shades of People for 50 Shades of Green." (Bono)

"Mark Carney’s indispensable new book asks how we can go from knowing the price of everything to understanding its true value. From the Great Financial Crisis to climate change and the coronavirus pandemic, this is the essential handbook for 21st-century leaders, policymakers and everyone who wants to build a fair and sustainable world." (Christine Lagarde) 

"A road map to a fairer and more responsible, resilient world. Carney offers trenchant insights into our relationship with money and status, imagination and responsibility critical to our world’s future. What do we invest in - profit or human potential? This book is irradiated with the inspiring and critical conviction that money can be transformed into a tool of collective good." (Antony Gormley) 

What listeners say about Value(s)

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Perfect book if you’re a politician and want to learn about how to BS people

This book continues spreading dangerous fantasies about carbon sequestration technologies and “sustainable” economic growth to combat the climate emergency. There is no such thing as sustainable growth when the whole idea of GDP growth is corrupted and evil in the first place.

Hello Mark Carney, do you know what is the best carbon sequestering technology that already exists? It’s called a FOREST. What about if we just stop extracting natural resources? Of course this is not an option! Why? Because Mr. Carney pretends to be sympathetic with left wing ideologies as a former Director of the Bank of England (I mean, seriously?) in order to trick you into listening to his extremely conservative views. The aim of it is to clearly continue with “business as usual” while pretending to care and publicly look like you are doing something about it.

The book fails to address the fact that our whole economic system is based around the idea of extraction, colonialism and invasion. This is not something you can magically fix by just switching a few buttons here and there and suddenly adapting Value to Values. It’s structural, and the more we keep talking about the nonsense contained in this book the deeper we’re digging our own graves.

If you want to read a truly honest book and a perfect analysis about the current state of things please check out “Less is More” by Jason Hickel and don’t waste your time with this.

3 people found this helpful

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Values are the basis of value

Former Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney has written this long book (20 hours plus) in which he reflects on how market economies become market societies. Aware that markets are fundamentally a human construct he ponders whether it is possible to turn markets back into humanity the same way that grappa can be turned back into wine. He considers his time at the Bank of England (and prior role at the Bank of Canada) as fleeting visits to something that is permanent and ever lasting and ponders the fact that there have been a couple of hundred people in the role prior to his tenure, most of whom are long forgotten. Few, however, will have shepherded the Old Lady of Theadneedle Street through such challenging times.
Mr Carney considers that the three largest challenges facing the financial world at the moment are Credit, COVID and Climate change. Although a force for the good he sees markets as social concepts that need social capital and is scathing of crypto currencies that lack the human element in their development. Mr Carney does not believe however that the markets can solve everything and, to him, the four scariest words in the English language are "this time it's different".
There undoubtedly some fascinating and original thinking in this book and I was genuinely interested in the section on purposefully based companies being more successful, I could, however, have done with a little less on the long section on the history of banking and the chapter on corporate governance both of which were unnecessary and have been done better by others. Mark Carney will be one of the few Bank of England former governors who will be remembered. And for the right reasons.

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Excellent

Mark Carney has an excellent command of the English language and exceptional knowledge about economics. I liked his use of academic references to make his points. He gave a lot of value based solutions to solve future problems.

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good book, useless

Giving this five stars, I think you should read this book, and tell your freinds about it, because I hope that it can get in the hands of someone who can actually put it's ideas into practice. if you're not in the one percent, this book will basically be an exercise in wishful thinking, at times it'll make you feel powerless, because it's not really written for you. but i still think you should share it. and maybe someday someone with actual power might read it

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Too long!

It feels like there is a great, much shorter book struggling to get out of this overly long one

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Masterclass in the big issues that matter now.

I wasn't sure whether I'd get through this but I'm glad I was drawn in more and more as it progressed. It is a remarkable & panoramic tour by an informed, involved & wise tour guide of the societal, environmental, economic & financial issues that we must grapple with and solve.

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What a book!!!

This is the best book I’ve read and can’t wait to read it again.It is accessible, focused yet comprehensive of its chosen topic.

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A must listen if you want to understand the globalist perspective

From his ivory tower, Carney sets out a potted history of economics, regurgitates management seminars on ‘purpose’, and talks about his place in history. There is a chapter on humility, which was sorely lacking throughout the epic. As we head to the ‘G-0’ world he believes addressing climate change is the greatest economic opportunity of our time. I am sure he will do well out of it.

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Essential reading for professionals everywhere

What can I say? A powerhouse of thought from Carney. Both grand and details focused, whilst never losing lucidity.

Those from outside the financial profession (like me) will likely find a few parts less valuable, but nevertheless the writing style won't leave you behind.

Chapters 12 "breaking the tragedy of the horizon" & 13 "values based leadership" were the cream of the crop for me, and I am left with a great clarity of thought regarding my own professional challenges.

Carney does struggle at a few points in the actual reading of the text, with word fumbles here and there, but don't let that put you off for a second.

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value and values explained in a global context

value and values explained in a global sustainable content.

not negative.
not positive.
real
well done Mark Carney