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  • The Tragedy of Great Power Politics

  • By: John J. Mearsheimer
  • Narrated by: Mark Ashby
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (53 ratings)

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The Tragedy of Great Power Politics cover art

The Tragedy of Great Power Politics

By: John J. Mearsheimer
Narrated by: Mark Ashby
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Summary

A decade after the cold war ended, policy makers and academics foresaw a new era of peace and prosperity, an era in which democracy and open trade would herald the "end of history." The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, sadly shattered these idyllic illusions, and John Mearsheimer's masterful new book explains why these harmonious visions remain utopian.

To Mearsheimer, great power politics are tragic because the anarchy of the international system requires states to seek dominance at one another's expense, dooming even peaceful nations to a relentless power struggle. Mearsheimer illuminates his theory of offensive realism through a sweeping survey of modern great power struggles and reflects on the bleak prospects for peace in Europe and northeast Asia, arguing that the United States's security competition with a rising China will intensify regardless of "engagement" policies.

©2001 John J. Mearsheimer (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

What listeners say about The Tragedy of Great Power Politics

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Repetition

Perhaps a bit too repetitive could have been retold through a historical perspective and timeline

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Must read to understand international politics

Fascinating analysis and a model you can rely on to understand geopolitics.
Must read to understand international politics

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Fantastic book.

Great book with loads of true facts and suppositions.

Is not easy listening as many books about politics.

I guess this book is more focused on students and those deeply interested in politics.

Overall it worth listening .

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1 person found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars

The best modern explanation of Real Politik

It is fashionable in political circles to disparage political realism as an outmoded and short sighted prism of international relations, and while this reader does not currently place substantial stock within this paradigm, nonetheless, one can acknowledge the masterly way Mearsheimer argues the realist case, both throughout history, and with regard to contemporary realities.
A criticism one may raise is that the book's historical analysis is too heavily focused upon the two world wars, however, Mearsheimer's purpose is the exploration of geopolitical dynamics, not necessarily history itself.
As the book was written in 2001, his analysis of the contemporary world provides an interesting exploration of the realist paradigm, however, with hindsight, it does not appear to lend so much credence to the advocacy of realism, as many of the scenarios, such as a greater Euro centric defence environment, have not come to pass, and the security dynamics in both Europe and North East Asia remain largely unchanged.
However, John Mearsheimer's book is an absolutely essential book for any student of international relations, or for graduates of international relations (like this reader) who wish to revise their understanding.

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8 people found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
  • C
  • 03-08-22

Wrong

the world is too nuanced for this book to make sense, do not recommend reading

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