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The Glorious Life of the Oak

Narrated by: Leighton Pugh
Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
3.5 out of 5 stars (5 ratings)
Regular price: £17.99
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Summary

Random House presents the audiobook edition of The Glorious Life of the Oak by John Lewis-Stempel, read by Leighton Pugh.

'The oak is the wooden tie between heaven and earth. It is the lynch pin of the British landscape.'

The oak is our most beloved and most common tree. It has roots that stretch back to all the old European cultures, but Britain has more ancient oaks than all the other European countries put together. More than half the ancient oaks in the world are in Britain. 

Many of our ancestors - the Angles, the Saxons, the Norse - came to the British Isles in longships made of oak. For centuries the oak touched every part of a Briton's life - from cradle to coffin. It was oak that made the 'wooden walls' of Nelson's navy, and the navy that allowed Britain to rule the world. Even in the digital Apple age, the real oak has resonance - the word speaks of fortitude, antiquity, pastoralism. 

The Glorious Life of the Oak explores our long relationship with this iconic tree. It considers the life cycle of the oak; the flora and fauna that depend on the oak; the oak as medicine, food and drink; and where Britain's mightiest oaks can be found, and it tells of oak stories from folklore, myth and legend. 

©2018 John Lewis-Stempel (P)2018 Random House Audiobooks

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Interesting facts but limited in scope

The oak is a fascinating tree but this account of its place in our culture looks hastily put together though the author's knowledge and research is obviously thorough. Anecdotes are too sketchy , landscapes limited, personal recollections very sparse. This looks like a rushed money spinner, rather than the loving accounts of the natural world I have come to expect from this author.