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Summary

A rich old man, Rupert Moncrieff, is beaten to death in the silence of his West Country waterside mansion, his head hooded and his throat cut. His extended family are still living beneath his roof, each with their own room, their own story, their own ghosts, and their own motives for murder. And in this world of darkness and dysfunction are the artefacts and memories of colonial atrocities that are returning to haunt them all.

At the heart of the murder investigation is DS Jimmy Suttle who, along with his estranged journalist wife Lizzie, is fighting his own demons after the abduction and death of their young daughter, Grace.

But who killed Rupert Moncrieff? And what secrets is the house holding onto that could unravel this whole investigation? The enquiry takes Suttle to Africa and beyond as he slowly begins to understand the damage that human beings can inflict upon one another. Not simply on the battlefield. Not simply in the torture camps in the Kenyan bush. But much, much closer to home.

©2014 Graham Hurley (P)2014 Isis Publishing Ltd

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unimpressive

very mixed feelings about this book, the main murder mystery was very weak, yet the side story running through was really quite gripping and the only thing that kept me listening. The character Oona was just ridiculous although I can't decide whether that's the narrator's fault rather than the author but it was a throw away line by a character that only appears once. a line that doesn't move the story forward, has no relevance and is not challenged by other characters spoilt the whole book.. have no idea how it got past editing but someone should point out to author and publishing house that wanton racism and misogyny are deeply offensive.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful