Regular price: £18.29

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

The New York Times best-selling author of The Origins of Political Order offers a provocative examination of modern identity politics: its origins, its effects, and what it means for domestic and international affairs of state 

In 2014, Francis Fukuyama wrote that American institutions were in decay, as the state was progressively captured by powerful interest groups. Two years later, his predictions were borne out by the rise to power of a series of political outsiders whose economic nationalism and authoritarian tendencies threatened to destabilize the entire international order. These populist nationalists seek direct charismatic connection to “the people”, who are usually defined in narrow identity terms that offer an irresistible call to an in-group and exclude large parts of the population as a whole. 

Demand for recognition of one’s identity is a master concept that unifies much of what is going on in world politics today. The universal recognition on which liberal democracy is based has been increasingly challenged by narrower forms of recognition based on nation, religion, sect, race, ethnicity, or gender, which have resulted in anti-immigrant populism, the upsurge of politicized Islam, the fractious “identity liberalism” of college campuses, and the emergence of white nationalism. Populist nationalism, said to be rooted in economic motivation, actually springs from the demand for recognition and therefore cannot simply be satisfied by economic means. The demand for identity cannot be transcended; we must begin to shape identity in a way that supports rather than undermines democracy. 

Identity is an urgent and necessary book - a sharp warning that unless we forge a universal understanding of human dignity, we will doom ourselves to continuing conflict. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Francis Fukuyama (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 3.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Shahin
  • 19-09-18

Robotic narrator

Book content was excellent, but the gentleman narrating it for audible audiobook version read it like a robot reads an official memo.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 13-09-18

Good one if ur new to Fukuyama

Nice book only if u r new to Fukuyama but if u have read his others books then I think he is not offering that much of new thing other than repacking his idea

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 04-10-18

Great Read!

Really interesting storytelling. Despite being about a heavy subject, this story did not depress me. It feels hopeful and beautiful.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • purpleisafruit
  • 20-10-18

vocal fry at the end of every sentence

I found the performance significantly detracted from the story. It took a few chapters before I was able to focus on the content

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • M. Kaplan
  • 19-10-18

Great way to put current events in perspective

As usual, Francis Fukuyama lays out the historical, sociological and political background of humans in a clear, understandable account that allows us to make sense of where we are now. I found his introductory remark comforting, that he was moved to write this book by the election of Trump. We need to see how this happened and be prepared to work for change, if we want to change the course we’re on.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Theresa Larkin
  • 16-10-18

Astute, engaging analysis of our present political moment.

An entirely accessible account of the impact and effect of identity in all of its various manifestations in the era of emergent nationalism. A vital book to read numerous times in order to comprehend the era of Trump.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Tom
  • 12-10-18

Good Analysis of the Rise of Identity Politics

Identity Politics underlies the painful polarization Western Society is experiencing in the current decade. It is therefore critical that we come to some understanding of the idea and it’s history, current status and future. This is the theme of Fukuyama’s latest book.

He traces the notion from its roots in the shift from Hunter-Gatherer and Agrarian thru Industrial to Post-Industrial Societies and the incumbent upheavals caused by each. He traces the impact of philosophies of Rousseau, Kant, Hegel and Nietzsche, Paine, and the Reformation in developing the concepts of the Rights of Man.

This history brings us to the Modern Era and the ongoing struggle between Liberalism and Nationalism we struggle with today, particularly with the introduction of the Ethno-Nationalism preached by the Ultra-Right and maybe even the push for Anarchy driven by some on the Left.

The recurring theme running through Identity is that of the Thumos: the Inner Self we all possess that demands to be recognized and which demands Dignity and Respect. Those of us who lived through the Sixties will recognize the emphasis of this Inner Self in the EST, Esalen, and other Self-Actualization Movements. Fukuyama traces much of our current progress and problems to this Era which gave rise to the Civil Rights, Feminist, Environmental, LGBTQ and other associated efforts to recognize this Thumos and its associated Identity and achieve the respect and dignity each group felt it deserved.

These Movements continue to evolve and splinter into sub-Movements like Black Lives Matter, Transgender Rights, etc. While he recognizes the achievements of each he also sees the danger of further and further fragmentation of our Identity into narrower groups that can be hijacked by aggrieved White Nationalists, Nazis, autocrats and demagogues.

All this analysis brings the reader to a final chapter where we hope for some suggestion as to how to channel the recognized power of the Thumos into a beneficial use of Identity. Here is where the disappointment comes in. Fukuyama’s only idea is for Governments to enact policies that encourage the fusion of these splintered identities into a National Identity which transcends them.

While his suggestions are praiseworthy I doubt that they can overcome the pain that rises from such a powerful inner drive not being satisfied.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Rumi Faizer
  • 11-10-18

read by a computer. great material.

to bad this is read by what sounds like a machine. excellent material and s lot to think through. conclusion is hopefully but not likely

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • MICHAEL K SANDIFER
  • 09-10-18

Moderately good read, no real epiphanies!

The narrator is the worst I have ever heard, the person sounds like a robot and has no rhythm along with tone. After listening I would not recommend this book based on what Fukuyama has put out in the past.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 06-10-18

Great Content Poorly Narrated

The idea is masterfully woven from many strands of wisdom dating back to Socrates.