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Summary

Piles of junk in garages and closets, overflowing papers on desks, items unused for years, masses of unanswered email, clothing never worn, useless gifts that collect dust; all these things, says Brooks Palmer, come weighted with shame and guilt and have a suffocating effect on spirit and soul. In this insightful book, Palmer shows how to get rid of the things in our lives that no longer serve us. By tossing out these unneeded items, we are also eliminating their negative influences, freeing up energy, and unlocking our potential.

Loaded with inspiring anecdotes and practical tips, Clutter Busting is based on the premise that your things are not sacred, but you are. The book explores such fundamental topics as the false identities we assume through clutter, the fear of change those junk piles represent, the addictive nature of holding on to objects, how clearing clutter makes room for clarity and sweeps away confusion and stasis, and much more. With Brooks's upbeat and compassionate guidance, you'll find yourself clearing the way for new and exciting things to come into your life.

©2015 Brooks Palmer (P)2015 New World Library

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Making a Start

Great book, not just for the "hoarder" themselves, but for loved ones to read/listen to if they would like to help and to understand the disorder.

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Insightful and inspiring.

of the many books I've read on this topic, this is the best so far!

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Life changing

Great book. I recommend everyone to read it. What he says is true! After hearing the first couple of chapters whilst driving, I got home and went straight to it. Feeling freer after clearing just half a room. Will continue to declutter as doing one room at a time!! Definitely life changing.

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  • Brainy Gal
  • 09-03-17

Best Book I've Ever Read (Listened to) on Clutter

I've read a LOT of books on clutter. And, thanks to those (especially Peter Walsh - "It's All Too Much"), I got rid of a lot of the easy stuff. But several cluttery things have persisted, and until now, I was unable to move forward.

First, let me say that I consider myself a competent, emotionally stable, and confident person. Anyone who knows me would say the same. I've been a leader, a mentor, and the go-to person if you feel stuck. Further, if you walked into my house, you'd ask.. "what clutter?". I've hid it all well into closets, nice storage containers, and neatly stacked piles hidden behind closed doors. That said, the pile of clothes in my large walk-in closet is another story. I've also neatly organized overwhelming amounts of recipes, art, home décor, junk mail that "might" interest me someday, plants (and vases), cleaning products, candles etc. I've also accumulated e-mail that I can't seem to delete, and obligations and people that I don't particularly want in my life. This book has caused me to see things about myself that I have not seen previously. There are parts of myself I have buried into my closets, piles, and commitments, including ambivalent and conflicting beliefs about what I want and who I want to be.

This book has made me see that my stuff is holding me back. For example. I realize that my closet holds clothing that represents the person I wish I could become (clothing that is too small, or was trendy in the magazine/store), and clothing that represents the person I fear I could become (clothes that are too large -- you know.. in case I get too fat!! ). This has forced me to ask myself...."who am I in this moment?... who do I want to become? Do I really want to become this person that wears this mini-skirt, or this oversized elasticized waisted pair of shorts? Why am I not wearing these now?"... Then I realize I'm ashamed of the body I have and the weight I am... and holy cr@#....what a Pandora's box of emotion in that closet! I had no idea that I was feeling shame about how I looked, and these items that are too small, or sexy and trendy just serve as a reminder of that shame. And the clothes that are too big serve as a reminder that I fear I'll be out-of-control with eating -- another shameful belief. I *NEVER* pictured myself as a person who has shame about anything. Geeze. If you told me I'd see my stuff in this light (before reading this book), I'd have told you that you were crazy. Not me.

With the help of this author I've actually connected dots between my "stuff", my weight, my self-image, and what's really important to me. I've even started seeing why I continue to buy more, and eat more, and take on more responsibilities than I want to have. WOW....Epiphany City!

One of my favorite *reminders* from this author is to also "let go" of "expectations". This is huge for me. Sometimes I can get too attached to how I want things to go, or to be. And this doesn't allow space for other unexpected (and good) things to enter. It's also incredibly draining mentally. It is a fabulous reminder to create empty spaces so that things can enter that serve us better. and to let go of outcomes. He offers plenty of "exercises" to do in order to help let go of these things and make space for the things that better represent who we are right now, and who we want to become.

I highly recommend this book, and encourage all who read/listen to this book to keep an open mind about what you might find.

56 of 56 people found this review helpful

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  • Hugsbie
  • 06-12-16

Best Ever

I've read many books on cluttering, but this one has more insight than I've ever heard before. listened twice, and will no doubt listen again. It is so inspiring. Loved it!

10 of 10 people found this review helpful

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  • Krymylda MacDonald
  • 10-09-16

Absolutely the best book on decluttering I have read

Once I started listening I started decluttering almost finished. The way he compares the inside and outside clutter is absolutely true

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Steven Brittain
  • 13-03-16

EXCELLENT!!

The content of this book is amazing, and it will be invaluable to anyone with a clutter problem.

Brooks narrates the book beautifully and conveys the content in a calm, kind and non-judgemental manner.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

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  • Tigargurl
  • 08-01-18

Mostly Repetitive Stories, Little Substance

Mostly terrible, Marie Kondo’s “The Magic of Tidying Up” is way better. Most of the book is the author retelling how he (quite quickly and easily) discovered and solved his client’s psychological issue that was causing them to have clutter. It’s sappy, repetitive, and sometimes unrealistic. I’m not sure that every person with clutter has a deep-rooted psychological issue, with me it’s just that I was raised to save everything! It’s hard to break a habit you were taught from childhood. Palmer does not give many strategies about how to actually go about decluttering like Kondo does, and he doesn’t give any actual advice about decluttering until 5 hrs 11 min into the book, so you get about 18 minutes.

The only thing in the book that resonated with me was when he said when we can’t part with something we’re thinking about how the object made us feel, NOT how it makes us feel now. He says you should ask if it fits your life and gives this analogy: “When you’re 9 yrs old, you might wear a size 3 shoe, but when you’re 10, your foot is bigger. You can look at the size 3 shoe and say “this shoe is good for me, look how it kept my feet safe for the past year” but you’re not seeing that it no longer fits you and now hurts your foot. You’re using memory rather than how you are feeling now as a gauge. You’re probably walking around with size 3 shoes and complaining that your feet hurt, but not recognizing your shoes as the source of your discomfort”. In the short and long run they’re hurting you. The best way to make sense of your life is to ask honest questions about your things. Is this object important to you now? Does it bring you benefit? Is it in the way? Are you saving it because of the memories? Can you let it go? Would you like to have something new and better? You have outgrown many, many of the items you currently surround yourself with.” There, now you don’t have to waste the money and 5 hrs 39 min reading the book!

14 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • Pokey Stargazer
  • 25-02-17

The most insightful organizing book I've found

He speaks slowly and unemotional but hang in there because you will learn a lot about your self and how to get to clarity and peace with your stuff!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Skols
  • 27-11-16

Awesome!

Brooks tells it like it is... And he gives you the emotional armor and tools you need to make a change in your home and life. Thank you Brooks Palmer!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Ruth Feole
  • 21-10-16

Saved me from a lifetime of clutter.

it showed me a new way to look at the way clutter affects my whole life.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • annonymous
  • 12-03-17

very helpful to inspire clutter clearing

If you could sum up Clutter Busting in three words, what would they be?

Inspiring motivating transformative

What did you like best about this story?

This book really helps to clarify the psychological causes of clutter and helps inspire letting go of clutter and create a happier life.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • BRC
  • 01-02-17

tough love

I'm a nut for decluttering inspiration and this is my all time favorite book on the subject. Unlike the very brilliant Konmari (her books are awesome too), this author has no sympathy for the objects stuffing your house. I've listened to this book several times (including during decluttering marathons) and it gives me the strength to just throw the carp away.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful