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Summary

1928. Agatha Christie leaves England for Baghdad, where two years ago, explorer and writer Gertrude Bell died from a drugs overdose. The authorities believed that Bell had taken her own life, but a letter now unearthed reveals she was afraid someone wanted to kill her. Bell writes that if she were to die, the best place to look for her murderer would be Ur, an archaeological site in Mesopotamia. Looking into Bell's death, Agatha discovers the mission is not without risk. She must use all her skills to try to outwit a killer who hides among the desert sands....

©2019 Andrew Wilson (P)2019 Oakhill Publishing

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Sound quality not always there

I sometimes struggled to hear this, which was a great shame, as I thoroughly enjoyed the story. Sometimes the narrator was just too quiet, even with the volume turned up - and I’m speaking as someone with no hearing issues at all!

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A must read for all Agatha Christie fans

This is the third of the series and just as good as the first two. The characters are really well drawn. you really get a clear picture of the environment without each scene being overly descriptive. The first-person narrative really helps and you do feel like you're with them.

As someone who's read all of Agatha Christie's works I do miss that thrill of the first time I got to read one of her her books. now I have the next best thing with Andrews series and relish every minute of it. there is the old excitement of wondering who the murderer is is and following along and trying to solve it then the realisation that the books coming to an end there's a sadness. I'm so glad that with this one I know there is another book I can start reading straight away made it easier. So here I go on to book four, can't wait!

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Loved this

I loved this book, the story, the way in which it was written and performed, Joan Walker is an excellent narrator.
I loved the fact that this twists real fact and fiction into it’s pages and if you are a regular Christie reader, you will sniff plots from different novels showing up from time to time.
I have read all thee Wilson books and this is battling for the position of favourite one.
You will love this if you are a Christie fan and even if you are not, it is still a great story.
Go for it, i dare you! 😆

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  • Fede
  • 06-01-20

Oh my, poor Agatha.

Agatha Christie wasn't a Nobel Prize in literature, but compared to Andrew Wilson, she reads like one. Murder in Mesopotamia has a really implausible ending, but compared to Death in a Desert Land it's as credible as a scientific treatise. The characters are a bunch of obnoxious idiots, and this unbearable version of Agatha speaks and behaves like a cross between a cheap psychotherapist and a shopkeeper who has to calm an unreasonable client. The whole thing is really the festival of cliche and, despite the messed-up plot, the culprit is obvious long before the end of the book. I only listened to the end because of the fascination that Agatha Christie, the Woolleys, Mesopotamia and archaeology continue to exercise even in this ridiculous and debased form.
Joan Walker's reading doesn't help: Agatha always talks as if she were sedated, Katharine is shrill and unpleasant beyond what is necessary, Americans and Scots are cheap vaudeville.