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Summary

Brought to you by Penguin. 

Fully revised and updated with three new chapters.

Boxing is Steve Bunce's game. He has filed thousands and thousands of fight reports from ringside. He has written millions and millions of words for national newspapers previewing boxing, profiling boxers and proselytising on the business. He has been the voice of British boxing on the airwaves, both radio and television, with an army of loyal fans. And now it's time to put those many years of experience into penning his history of the sport of kings on these isles. It's Bunce's Big Fat Short History of British Boxing

Starting in 1970, the beginning of modern boxing in Britain, Bunce takes us from Joe Bugner beating Henry Cooper to an explosion then in the sport's exposure to the wider British public, with 22 million watching Barry McGuigan win his world title on the BBC. All boxing royalty is here - Frank Bruno taking on Mike Tyson in Las Vegas; Benn, Watson, Eubank and Naseem; Ricky Hatton, Lennox Lewis and Calzaghe; Froch and Haye - through to a modern-day situation where with fighters as diverse as Tyson Fury and Anthony Joshua, we have more world champions than ever before. And besides the fighters, there are the fixers, the managers, the trainers, the duckers and divers.... 

Bunce's Big Fat Short History of British Boxing has every high and impossible low, tragic deaths and fairy tales. It is a record of British boxing, British boxing people and 50 years of glory, heartache and drama. 

©2021 Steve Bunce (P)2021 Penguin Audio

What listeners say about Bunce's Big Fat Short History of British Boxing

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WOW!

Just wow. I'm a huge boxing fan and I'm just so happy many boxers makes won't just disappear into the ether like they used too.
I grew up in the Nigel Benn era of huge fights on ITV, who remains my boxing hero to this day.
it also captures the king forgotten world of smoky working man's clubs of the 70s and 80s. exactly how I remember it, with nostalgia and heartache.
I'll be going back over this book many, many times

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A Big but flat history

Buncie’s take on British boxing history is both exhaustive and exhausting. It begins at a time before the author was an adult, so the stories recounted are of necessity sourced from (I suppose) contemporary reports and lack any insight. Much of the rest of the book reminds me of those bits of the Old Testament where someone begat someone who begat someone else.

Here we get lots of someone beat someone who in turn was defeated by somewhere else. It’s like reading a history of a war that consists largely of a list of skirmishes and battles and the winner of each event.

Where we do get a bit of narrative (such as the story of the recently deceased Kirkland Laing for example) we get to hear the same stories that he has recycled on his Radio 5 podcast, or lifts from his old newspaper articles. These are occasionally iced over with comments like “there was a reason for this but I can’t tell you what it was for legal reasons.”

An underwhelming and frustrating listen, that could and should have been more entertaining.

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What a knockout

Been a boxing fan since early 2000’s.

First saw the book but then realised there was a audio version so went for that. I’ve always been interested on other fighters i had heard about from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s like Ken Buchanan, Jim watt, herol Graham, Lloyd honegan, minter etc so to hear about what type of careers these men had made for a great listen.

Steve mentions about fighters I’d never heard of winning British titles and boxers struggling to get selected for the olympics. But most importantly for me Steve discusses the boxers who have sadly passed away either shortly after a fight or with struggles outside the ring which makes this book special.


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Couldn’t put it down

What a tour of the history of British boxing narrated in an informative, often funny and heartbreaking at times.

Steve, i doff my hat to you son

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Very good book , would recommend

Excellent book, full of interesting information and good inside knowledge

bunce accent is a bit annoying but he knows his stuff

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A wonderful journey through British boxing.

Steve Bunce at his very best. Informative, funny and sometimes tragic, buncy captures it all perfectly.