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Summary

London, 2013, and the city is battling an epidemic of serial killings - even with the widespread government use of DNA detection, brain-imaging, and the 'punitive coma'. 

Detective Isadora 'Jake' Jacowicz is hunting a murderer, code-named 'Wittgenstein', who has taken it upon himself to eliminate anyone who has tested positive for a tendency towards violent behaviour - even if they've never committed a crime. 

His intellectual brilliance is matched only by his homicidal madness.

©1992 Philip Kerr (P)2020 Quercus Editions Limited

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An extraordinary story you must stay with.

From Philip Kerr I was expecting just the usual high quality Kerr story. This is different, still a quality story though delivered through the mouths of different people working on very contrasting levels. At first I was irritated with its structure but that was my problem with not dealing with a strangely, odd creature. I stuck with it and learned much. At times the sharp cleverness and knotted philosophical game playing can seem very nerdy and pretentious but it's all essential in the movement of the story. I recommend this to those listeners tired of simple whodunit stories , 'cos this ain't

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Love it

I first read this book in the early 90’s and although dated now as we are in the 21st century. I still enjoy the book and it’s take on serial killing becoming common place. I was doing my philosophy degree when I first read it so also loved how all the men that came forward were given a philosophers name. I also enjoyed the philosophical angle did knowing he had the faulty gene make him a serial killer. Or would he have become a serial killer if he hadn’t been tested. Looking forward to listening this again

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so so

narattion appalling. telephone conversations inaudible. story line more interesting in the background making me think the book was written years ago

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  • kiwijase
  • 13-10-20

The Future is disorienting

Very nearly gave up on this one, Lacking as it does Kerrs usual impeccably researched Historical setting. But once I got past the first 5 chapters its as engrossing as all his other books.