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Summary

In this combative, controversial book, Terry Eagleton takes issue with the prejudice that Marxism is dead and done with. Taking 10 of the most common objections to Marxism - that it leads to political tyranny, that it reduces everything to the economic, that it is a form of historical determinism, and so on - he demonstrates in each case what a woeful travesty of Marx's own thought these assumptions are.

In a world in which capitalism has been shaken to its roots by some major crises, Why Marx Was Right is as urgent and timely as it is brave and candid. Written with Eagleton's familiar wit, humor, and clarity, it will attract an audience far beyond the confines of academia.

©2018 Yale University (P)2018 Tantor

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Great

A wonderful book for those who believes Marx is still relevant in the twenty first century

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Stephen
  • 11-08-18

A Brilliant Narrator

The narration was brilliant. I expected more from the author Terry Eagleton though. Eagleton does a good job in making Marx's ideas accessible and relevant. However he sometimes gets caught up in the cleverness and wit of his prose at the expense of shedding light on Marx's concepts of class, history, alienation and cultural theory.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • John
  • 02-09-18

Reason’s Triumph

A reasoned intellectual response to the anti-Marxist,anti-socialist hysteria that masquerades as discourse.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 30-07-18

Funny and smart

The author is ridiculously well read, and teaches you about different forms of socialism. And often makes me laugh. The narrator is also very strong.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Shane Gardner
  • 31-07-18

helpful, informative and straightforward

Honest review of Marx by a Marxist, sometimes lacked facts and stated opinions as truth.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • AmusedAbsurdity
  • 12-11-18

Socialism as Ethics

The biggest misunderstanding of Marx is the notion that he and Socialism was/is diametrically opposed to Capitalism. Socialism is actually a guide on how to have an ethical capitalist economy.
Eagleton concludes that leisure over labor was Marx’s ideal. If we as a society recognize a government’s job is to uphold basic human rights and work together to ensure that those rights are provided for, and we all received some kind of personal subsidy for housing and food, with a job guaranteed of a livable wage, free public education and universal healthcare, then yes we would pay more taxes, but we would have the most expensive costs be affordable, and then have more time to enjoy life.