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Summary

Following his highly acclaimed and best-selling book England: An Elegy (Bloomsbury Continuum), Roger Scruton now seeks to assess the basis of national sentiment and loyalty at a time when the United Kingdom must redefine its position in the world.

To what are our duties owed and why? How do we respond to the pull of globalisation and mass migration that are erasing the face of our country, to the rise of Islam and to the decline of Christian belief and the culture our ancestors built on? Do we accept these as inevitable, or do we resist them? If we resist them, on what basis do we build? In order to answer these questions, we need to revisit the foundations of our national experience.

Scruton surveys the British legacy - social, legal, cultural and political - and animates those sentiments which attach us to it. In so doing he answers the most pressing question - how do we include in our national identity the various sources of opposition to it?

©2017 Roger Scruton (P)2017 Audible, Ltd

What listeners say about Where We Are

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Nicely read and well balanced arguments

Despite leaving me feeling at times gloomy about where we are and where we could be heading as a country, I found this a very illuminating book.

Whilst it could be hard listening for the more liberal elements of society, the arguments for and against certain points are balanced and well presented.

Great, unhurried narration also makes this title well worth a listen.

5 people found this helpful

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A Solid Declaration Of Where And Who We Are

I am sure that there will be many who, without reading this book, declare it to be something that it is not. Yet, this simple hymn to the right kind of nationalism is exactly what many in power need to listen to even if they refuse to do so. Scruton sees neither wokeness nor racism at every turn, but explains where the ever-widening political divide is stemming from and how to bridge it. An excellent book though some of it needs re-examining in light of our clown show government and submissive public in the face of the current crisis.

1 person found this helpful

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Excellent

Very good indeed. Sir Roger puts into lucid words many of my vague thoughts and feelings that I would never be able to articulate if I spent my life trying.

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Essential listening

Essential listening for all especially our nations next generation of adults. Lots of ideas and principles to rally around.

3 people found this helpful

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Scruton at his finest

I have yet to read a book by Sir Roger Scruton that I did not find insightful and enlightening, and this is no exception. Simply excellent.

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surprisingly optimistic

Scruton has an efficient, yet elegant way of discussing important ideas. Despite the controversial topics, I felt a great deal of love in the text, love did country, history, as well as his fellow men

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A lesson for our times

The erudite and oft maliciously misquoted Scruton sets out in bite sized pieces not only how we ( the British) got here but how we regain our identity to avoid our otherwise inevitable demise.

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Scruton re-hashes former works

A lot of what is here is not new. Scruton here repeats a lot of what he said elsewhere, for example in "England, an elegy". I like the man, I like his ideas, they are not weakened by repetition, but the book is.

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An excellent summary of our time..

A thought provoking summary of “Where We Are”, how we got here and some of the possible opportunities for us to embrace. Whether you want to remain or Leave the European Union this is a narrative that helps the listener to have a greater understanding of our current position and highlights the undoubted opportunities and problems that we may have to embrace and overcome. Saul Reichlin narration provides just the right tone and gravitas presenting a serious subject in an informative and pleasant way.

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Enlightening listen

A very good book and not just a one sided approach. Arguments are we made and reasoned..Some stark home truths as the author does not hide behind the pc wall so many do these days...Not a rant or a moan, just a well constructed piece of work. Will certainly be going back over the chapters.

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  • Philo
  • 09-12-17

What England brought to the world, and may again

This work is like catnip for Anglophiles, but I hope it gets a wider hearing. The author's love for England, the very soil and the virtues of its people, is touching. He recognizes what is beautiful in what is small, and personal. And he sees a connection from that to the overarching events of cultural brilliance that England has had, age after age.
I regret that, in my academic environment, those with too-common half-wits have managed to read a few sources and thereupon to close minds and to choose sides too hastily, maintaining staunchly that either (1) such an empire was merely a vampire (and that it admittedly was, in part) or else (2) it was the most perfectly good thing ever (and all the disaffected should doff hats reverently, take their scraps humbly, and never question that). This work definitely comes down on the pro-England side (and I would say, England as it was from the mossy primordial past through, say, Churchill), but with a sincerity and a clear telling. I happen to agree that such things as the Magna Carta and the Common Law were momentous and critical moments in the rise of humankind, still resonating (hopefully, into the future too) across our lives, and however dimly perceived, into our every day. And I think, for humankind's sake and England's, this bears repeating. I like that a book takes this view into the present, trying times, in the hands of a very bright author.

6 people found this helpful