Listen free for 30 days

Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Buy Now for £18.29

Buy Now for £18.29

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

After the death of their infant son, Hal and Rowan Graham decide to leave the mad bustle of London and move to a quiet country refuge. And the rustic village of Moorstone seems perfect. Too perfect? Lying beneath a hill capped by an enormous stone, Moorstone hides mysterious secrets. Why does such a small town need such a large insane asylum? Why do the village's elderly residents leave everything they own to young newcomers they barely know? And why is everyone so friendly, so handsome, and so preoccupied with Hal and Rowan's health?

Before the Grahams can piece the insidious puzzle together, they are plunged into a spiraling terror of ancient mysteries reborn, people who are not quite what they seem, and a village that is quaint, charming - and deadly!

When it comes to spine-chilling tales of quiet horror, no one surpasses Bernard Taylor, the best-selling author of the classic novels, The Godsend and Sweetheart, Sweetheart.

"Reaches its horrifying climax with seductive grace." (Library Journal)

"A fine atmosphere of terror." (New York Times)

"Slow-building occult horror." (Kirkus Reviews)

"His fiction grips and holds the reader.... Taylor is a master." (Publishers Weekly)

©1982, 2018 Bernard Taylor (P)2018 Valancourt Books

What listeners say about The Moorstone Sickness

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Lightweight and Forgettable '80s Horror

The Moorstone Sickness is a pretty uneventful '80s horror that signposts the 'twist' ending almost from the off. It's well written and I enjoyed it to a certain extent, but it's definitely not something I'll revisit.
Matthew Lyon does a fine job with the narration. His delivery is quite formal, but it suits this type of story.
This audiobook is decent enough, but nothing really to write home about.
Recommended if you're after something not too taxing.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Good listen

This book was written in the 80s if I remember correctly. The horror is more suggested than overt. Classic horror scenario.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

The Thicker Man

Subdued English folk horror from admired genre author Bernard Taylor. In all honesty I wanted to enjoy this more than I did; despite the winning combination of picturesque village and sinister pagan stones, this is a book that shows its hand early and offers few surprises. Recent cinematic variations on the theme, such as The Skeleton Key and Get Out, have added much needed subtext or post-modern smarts. Here, the pace is stately, the scene-setting competent but uninspired, the terror slightly tame. Originally published in 1982, this actually feels more dated still, like something from the '50s or '60s (one embarrassing sex scene aside). The way the book telegraphs its twists ahead of time makes the protagonists appear stupid and complacent in the face of the blindingly obvious danger that surrounds them. Ironically, the troubled relationship of the main characters is well-handled and would have been more interesting without the occult window dressing. The book's conclusion picks up the pace considerably, but leads to the sort of gritty ending common in '70s cinema and which is something I hate.
Narrator Matthew Lyon has a mannered, rather starchy delivery, which adds to the slightly old fashioned feel of the book, and, interestingly for a male narrator, his female voices are more engaging than those of his men.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Erin E. Hunter
  • Erin E. Hunter
  • 02-08-20

Fantastic horror, deeply sad.

Just absolutely heartbreaking work of fiction, and an exceptional horror story because of it. A classic for a reason.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jennifer Stover
  • Jennifer Stover
  • 15-01-20

Was slightly predictable

I figured it out that is the what and why but ending was a surprise still. That said it was still very good story and narrator did very good job with different voices. It reminded me of a movie I saw I think the name of it was the key or something along those lines with Kate Hudson. Which I might add I loved so I really did enjoy this book. Yes I would recommend this title to anyone interested. I was given this audio in exchange for honest and fair review for free. P.s I finished this audio in less than two days, couldn’t put it down.