Try an audiobook on us

The Hill to Die On

The Battle for Congress and the Future of Trump's America
Narrated by: Jake Sherman, Anna Palmer
Length: 12 hrs and 50 mins
4 out of 5 stars (5 ratings)
Regular price: £28.89
£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

The blue wave that swept through Washington in November and returned control of the House to Democrats was by no means ordained; it was the result of both a massive effort by the left and the failure of President Trump to heed warnings from his own party that its candidates were in grave danger. The Hill to Die On is the inside story of Trump’s first two years, viewed from Capitol Hill, where lawmakers on both sides of the aisle jockeyed for advantage as American politics reached a fever pitch. 

There may be no institution in America more disliked than Congress, where elected officials seem incapable of producing real benefits for Americans even as they do whatever it takes to ensure their own power. Enter Donald Trump, whose promises to drain the swamp rang hollow from the start, but who may in fact have been exactly what was needed to break congressional gridlock: an ideological black hole willing to make deals with both Democrats and Republicans. The Hill to Die On is the compelling, at times maddening tale of why that never happened and why, despite the clear preferences of most Americans on issues like taxes, immigration, and the criminal justice system, Trump’s Congress only further alienated voters. The turbulence it produced would return Nancy Pelosi to the speakership, expose the president to the possibility of impeachment, and lead to the longest government shutdown in US history. 

With inside access that takes listeners from the House to the White House, Politico Playbook writers Anna Palmer and Jake Sherman trace the strategy and the impulsiveness, the deal-making and the backstabbing, in a blow-by-blow account of the power struggle that roiled the halls of Congress. Moving from the battle between the conservative Freedom Caucus and Speaker Paul Ryan to the sexual assault accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh that threw the Senate into turmoil to the pitched battles across America in primaries and on Election Day, The Hill to Die On tells an unforgettable story of power and politics, where the stakes are nothing less than the future of Congress and the fate of America. 

©2019 Jake Sherman and Anna Palmer (P)2019 Random House Audio

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    1
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    2
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Enjoyable, detailed and informative

An enjoyable listen that gave good and interesting detail on the two years up utnill and after the midterms.
I preferred the woman's narration to the mans

Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • aslan
  • 09-04-19

Good material, mediocore narration

writing a book and narrating a book are 2 different talents. Thats the negative of many new books

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Michael J Canning
  • 03-05-19

Very timely, detailed, enjoyable

This is a first cut at explaining the race of the 115th Congress and the first half of Trump’s presidency and Trump’s Washington. As an observer of Congress and politics I enjoyed the book and learned many interesting factoids and tidbits. It is far from a definitive or even completely coherent history - but the authors don’t claim it as such. As contemporaneous reporting mixed with gossip and spin - it’s perfect. Unlike other reviewers I enjoyed the author’s narration.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 28-04-19

Great overall but..

Great book. Very interesting and put together in a logical, structured way. The only criticism I have is regarding Jake Sherman’s narration- he seems to be constantly out of breath! Don’t get me wrong it’s not that bad really but definitely distracting! Still a great book that I recommend you read/listen to!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Amanda De Wolf
  • 23-04-19

Decent, behind the scenes account. A couple of problems, though.

I’ve listened to many political books lately, mostly about the Trump presidency.
This book was informative from an insider report by journalists, but the sound volume varied and sometimes the readers seemed to get a little too excited about what they were reading.
My main gripes are with the overuse of the word “anathema”. How about changing it up with words like “abhorrent”, “abomination”, etc.
Also, when a credible journalist pronounces “nuclear” wrong (ala, George W. Bush) over and over, it makes you wonder how credible these two actually are.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lowball
  • 14-04-19

This Title May Be a Litttle Misleading

The title grabbed me. If I couldn't understand what was going on in Washington maybe seeing it through the eyes of Congress many help me come to terms with a president who shows a marked lack of concern for the consequences of his actions. The book shows a great number of details and the reaction of the congresspeople Not long though I got a sense this was more of an anthill with many ants going to and fro. The longing I had for a better idea of what Congress was up to was drowned in details. The Democratic party has given new power to those investigations into Trumps behaviors but it lacked an ability to use all these events to describe the true power of the Congress to keep the president in check, Because of that it was hard to finish his book and I felt no more enlightened as to the changes in the Federal government.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • dan m
  • 19-05-19

good inside look at your government

I found it rather boring , although it is a good inside look of what goes on in the Congress

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Tim Gillespie
  • 14-05-19

Political gossip

Like eating cotton candy—it’s good but no substance
Much of this includes old news stories

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Frank Murray VI
  • 23-04-19

Duality

This was a refreshing experience linking the duality of the author's narration. I admire the concept of this book.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 22-04-19

Great snapshot of 2016-2018 in politics, mediocre

A fascinating, timely story about contemporaneous politics. If you're fascinated by Trump-era Washington DC, it's a must-read. The narration is lacking, however: rushed and often fraught with mispronunciations.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Murphaleen
  • 22-04-19

Authors should have hired professional readers

I thought this audiobook would be to my liking but it was not. Actually I also purchased the Kindle version so perhaps I can offer a higher rating for the book after I read it. The subject is one that has long interested me and I can only hope that the book's content will be worthwhile.

Note to self: from now on remember to listen to an audio book sample before placing an order.

Regretfully, the authors of this book may be adept at writing, but are not are not equally gifted in the art of narration. Jake Sherman, whom I have seen several times in TV, delivers alternate chapters in a work-a-day fashion --- much like he is reading a report for class.

However, it is Anna Palmer's portions that are particularly difficult to listen to. Sorry to say this but her vocal range appears to be limited, her pace is rapid fire and most bothersome of all is her overall style. I realize that she is quite young, but surely in the field that she is in, she must know what "up-talking" and "vocal fry" are. I listened to one chapter that Anna read and although I found her delivery unnecessarily grating, I decided to try to listen to another one of her reads. First, I listened to Jake on the following chapter and then took a breath to relax before hearing Anna in the chapter after that.

I could not listen to but a brief passage before I had to shut the audio down. It was that irritating. Oddly, the few times I have seen Anna on TV, she did not appear to talk at such a fast clip or punctuate her speech with a raspy, rising tonality --- both of which come off sounding snippy, smug or snide. All I can think is that Anna was nervous when she recorded the book. O know that I would be. Whatever the reason, I could not listen any longer, but will read the book!