Listen free for 30 days

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

The best-selling author of Leonardo da Vinci and Steve Jobs returns.

In 2012, Nobel Prize winning scientist Jennifer Doudna hit upon an invention that will transform the future of the human race: an easy-to-use tool that can edit DNA.

Known as CRISPR, it opened a brave new world of medical miracles and moral questions. It has already been deployed to cure deadly diseases, fight the coronavirus pandemic of 2020 and make inheritable changes in the genes of babies. 

But what does that mean for humanity? Should we be hacking our own DNA to make us less susceptible to disease? Should we democratise the technology that would allow parents to enhance their kids?

After discovering this CRISPR, Doudna is now wrestling these even bigger issues.

The Code Breaker is an examination of how life as we know it is about to change - and a brilliant portrayal of the woman leading the way.

©2021 Walter Isaacson (P)2021 Simon & Schuster UK

What listeners say about The Code Breaker

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    81
  • 4 Stars
    19
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    74
  • 4 Stars
    15
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    73
  • 4 Stars
    17
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

interesting topic but writing is biased

such an interesting topic. Some of book was about Doudna, some about history of CRSPR, some seemed to be author's opinions. Much of book was biased and therefore didn't given a balanced history/story. Moralising was introduced and author's opinions shaded the story. At points, I wanted to give up on the book but I continued until the end. The story makes you believe that there is a lot of collaboration in science but that the American desire to be at the top ruins it.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Good to listen as a followip with the book

I listened to this whilst reading the book. It’s word for word as the book.

As for the story, it’s okish.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

eye opening

All the facts needed to help see through the web of information about the current global situation. great book,comes at the right time to combat misinformation about vaccines.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Interesting story but..

read in a monotone. Given the significance of this history why have it read like giving map directions?

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

It can get a little bit boring at times.

This is not to say that it is not a book with many redeeming merits and moments to it. But is a remarkable book for those who are gifted in, students of chemistry, or are gifted with an innate understanding of chemistry and,in particular, genetics. Unfortunately, I am not that well educated in the richer, and deeper corners of chemistry. The book has its moments of intense interest.Unfortunately for me, my background in cheistry and genetics was only enough to turn me into a very fine and highly sought after trauma nurse. Had I read the introduction to the book ,instead os instantly assumig it was about WW2 or Navoho codebreakers on the Japanese front. So my own carelessness taught me a valuable lesson I will continue to treasure, had I taken my time and not rushed in to pick the book without realizing that my background in research chemistry and especially genetic research and the fascination that lies in that field of study. So, by mistake and in my own haste for an absorbing read, I picked out a book which was quite smater than this reader is. But I do reccomend the book to those with the background and interest in these fields of study and research, and are prepared to absorb the knowledge with in its covers.