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The 39 Steps

Narrated by: B. J. Harrison
Series: Richard Hannay, Book 1
Length: 3 hrs and 54 mins
4.7 out of 5 stars (6 ratings)

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Summary

May 1914: Europe is on the brink of war. London is riddled with spies. Richard Hannay has just returned from Rhosesia, and intends to begin a new, quiet, sedentary life. But a shady man named Franklin Scudder calls on him for help. Scudder is a freelance spy who has just uncovered a German plot to murder the Greek Premier, thus forcing Europe into war. He is the only man living to have penetrated into the ring of German spies who call themselves the Black Stone. Scudder tells Hannay all he knows.

The next day, Scudder is murdered in Hannay's apartment. Now Hannay must continue Scudder's work. And so, with the Black Stone and the police on his trail, Hannay is chased across the wild country of Scotland. And while dodging his pursuers, he somehow has to find a way to contact the right people with British Intelligence. For if Scudder's code book falls into the hands of the enemy, all is lost.

Public Domain (P)2012 B.J. Harrison

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  • P. Teague
  • 24-04-18

Red blooded!

Fun, interesting glimpse into “a day in the times of” prewar Britain through a fiction-thriller lens. Originally a “man’s man” type book but I, as a female of the species, enjoyed it alot. Then again I feel male-centric stories are amusing rather than threatening or intended to keep the little woman down. This book has been made into film and tv movies but I prefer not to compare overmuch film v books because they are such different mediums, the main point being do they tell a story well. So I enjoy this book for what it is, and Hitchcock’s version for what it is and so on. PS I recognize this isn’t a synopsis but fortunately there are many other reviewers for that! 😁