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Summary

Edwardian London in 1910, the notorious tale of Dr Crippen and Ethel Le Neve re-investigated by a prizewinning journalist.

At a time when Edwardian Britain seemed a golden place, basking in its imperial glory, Dr Hawley Harvey Crippen and his wife, Belle, lived among the suburban villas of North London, renting a house at 39 Hilldrop Crescent. After supper on 31st January 1910, their friends went home and Crippen killed Belle with poison, dismembered her body and buried some of her remains beneath the brick floor of the coal cellar. Crippen never admitted killing his wife and took the secrets of the crime with him when he was hanged, following his conviction for murder.

It is assumed that Crippen killed for the love of his mistress, Ethel le Neve. They began living together as man and wife, but under intense suspicion, they fled disguised as father and son. The chase - indeed everything about the murder - was reported in fine detail, in Britain, in America and the rest of the Western world. Crippen was finally arrested and with Ethel was brought back to England for trial. 

David James Smith has investigated afresh this celebrated murder case, and his researches have uncovered unexpected and startling information about 'Chamber of Horrors' stalwart Dr Crippen, Belle and Ethel.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2021 David James Smith (P)2021 Weidenfeld & Nicolson

Critic reviews

"The definitive account of a crime which still intrigues, and to an extent baffles, aficionados of murder." (P D James)

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Still unsolved!

I have always been fascinated by this case and have read many books watch many documentaries. This book is meticulously researched and the accompanying PDF really brings the book to life. The narration is superb and is a pleasure to listen to. I was gripped from the very first page, the wonderful thing about this book is that start the book by thinking that you know the case and by the end of the book, you realise possibly that you did not know the case is all!!

The book still manages to evoke unanswered questions about the case, this book was written some years ago and briefly talks about recent discoveries in relation to skin samples which are currently being disputed is not being that of the victim. Which in itself is a very compelling question.

The PDF is amazing and includes pictures, some have been seen before, some particularly pictures of Crippen's mistress in later life. A very enlightening and leave all questions and answers. In the end, the opinion is that of the author. Admittedly it's backed with some fantastic research, but I believe this is a case where we will really never really know the truth about what happened.

If you're a lover of true crime. Please read this book. It's very addictive and I completed it in two sittings. It was also very interesting to see how the media of the day interpreted the events of the trial and execution of Crippen and raises some very unpleasant questions about the society of the day.