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Paris After the Liberation

Narrated by: Sean Barrett
Length: 15 hrs and 23 mins
4 out of 5 stars (35 ratings)
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Summary

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of Paris After the Liberation by Antony Beevor, read by Sean Barrett. 

Antony Beevor's Paris After Liberation: 1944-1949 is a remarkable historical account of the chaos and uncertainty that followed the liberation of Paris in August 1944.

Postliberation Paris: an epoch charged with political and conflicting emotions. Liberation was greeted with joy but marked by recriminations and the trauma of purges. The feverish intellectual arguments of the young took place amidst the mundane reality of hunger and fuel shortages. This is a thrilling, unsurpassed account of the drama and upheaval of one of history's most fascinating eras.

©2018 Antony Beevor and Artemis Cooper (P)2018 Penguin Books Ltd

Critic reviews

"A dashing, multi-dimensional story. This book covers all aspects of life - diplomacy, strategy, rationing, politics and politicking (from Churchill, Pétain's and de Gaulle's point of view), the international theatricals and the tourist invasion, blitzkrieg and Ritzkrieg - to create a lovely tapestry, threaded with facts and figures." (Olivier Todd, Sunday Times)

"Absorbing...a rich, many-layered account, selecting from official documents, private archives, memoirs and histories with a wonderful lightness of touch, so that the most complex events become clear." (Jenny Uglow, Independent on Sunday)

"A beautifully written book about a vast tapestry of military, political and social upheaval. Remarkably well-researched, wise, balanced, very funny at times...I was a witness to events in Paris in the first desperate, glorious, mad weeks, and this is just how it was." (Dirk Bogarde)

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Interesting book, shame about the voice.

An insightful study of the aftermath of war (an often neglected subject) and French national identity, almost completely ruined by a dull and monotonous delivery, though at least the narrator pronounces most French words correctly. A struggle to listen to, which is a great pity.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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historically important but a bit hard for audio

A hugely interesting period of history and much was learned about life in France during and after the war ended...it was a little heavy going for an audio book at times and the narrator's voice was easy to drown out until I tuned in on a bit that wasn't excessively in depth about French communists or CDG general disdain of all things..

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great!

There are so many ways in which the post-war history of France could have taken another route. A brilliant and detailed acount.

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Not the best from this author

Perhaps because this is not military history this is not the best book from this author. Still good objective analysis of an important period of European history that is not well covered outside of France.

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  • mcsmall
  • Larbert, Stirlingshire
  • 05-07-18

Disappointing

I have listened or read almost all of Antony Beevor's books, and think he is a fine military historian.Stalingrad was a masterpiece.However, this was a mixture of diferent elements in each chapter, some of which were anecdotal.
I also found Sean Barrett's voice somewhat anachronistic, reminding me of Pathe News.