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Summary

Drover, a Communist bus driver, is in prison, sentenced to death for killing a policeman during a riot at Hyde Park Corner. A battle for a reprieve with many participants ensues: the Assistant Commissioner, high-principled and over-worked; Conrad, a paranoid clerk; Mr Surrogate, a rich Fabian; Condor, a pathetic journalist feeding on fantasies; pretty, promiscuous Kay - all have a part to play in his fate.

James Wilby reads Graham Greene’s absorbing novel set in 1930s London.

©1934 1934 by Graham Greene, renewed Graham Greene, 1962 (P)2012 AudioGO Ltd

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Mental illness

This book was totally depressing. Nearer to mental illness than anything. Old world torture gone crazy. Self destruction at its heart. The unreal fantasies of a young man to paranoia of an older man. The society drifts along into avoidance. The characters thinking was haphazard using the real world to confuse. Women are treated as stupid. I wouldn't recommend this book to the sensitive or vulnerable. Why men write to deeply wound their readers is beyond me