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Everything Is F*cked

A Book About Hope
Narrated by: Mark Manson
Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (222 ratings)

Regular price: £21.99

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Summary

From the author of the international mega-best-seller The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck comes a counterintuitive guide to the problems of hope.

We live in an interesting time. Materially, everything is the best it’s ever been - we are freer, healthier, and wealthier than any people in human history. Yet, somehow everything seems to be irreparably and horribly f*cked - the planet is warming, governments are failing, economies are collapsing, and everyone is perpetually offended on Twitter. At this moment in history, when we have access to technology, education, and communication our ancestors couldn’t even dream of, so many of us come back to an overriding feeling of hopelessness. 

What’s going on? If anyone can put a name to our current malaise and help fix it, it’s Mark Manson. In 2016, Manson published The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck, a book that brilliantly gave shape to the ever-present, low-level hum of anxiety that permeates modern living. He showed us that technology had made it too easy to care about the wrong things, that our culture had convinced us that the world owed us something when it didn’t - and worst of all, that our modern and maddening urge to always find happiness only served to make us unhappier. Instead, the “subtle art” of that title turned out to be a bold challenge: to choose your struggle; to narrow and focus and find the pain you want to sustain. The result was a book that became an international phenomenon, selling millions of copies worldwide while becoming the number-one best seller in 13 different countries. 

Now, in Everthing Is F*cked, Manson turns his gaze from the inevitable flaws within each individual self to the endless calamities taking place in the world around us. Drawing from the pool of psychological research on these topics, as well as the timeless wisdom of philosophers such as Plato, Nietzsche, and Tom Waits, he dissects religion and politics and the uncomfortable ways they have come to resemble one another. He looks at our relationships with money, entertainment, and the internet, and how too much of a good thing can psychologically eat us alive. He openly defies our definitions of faith, happiness, freedom - and even of hope itself.

With his usual mix of erudition and where-the-f*ck-did-that-come-from humor, Manson takes us by the collar and challenges us to be more honest with ourselves and connected with the world in ways we probably haven’t considered before. It’s another counterintuitive romp through the pain in our hearts and the stress of our soul. One of the great modern writers has produced another book that will set the agenda for years to come. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2019 Mark Manson (P)2019 HarperCollins Publishers

What members say

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He shouldn't have read it himself

Now I know how important narrator is. The previous book was not only better because of the story but also had an excellent narrator. Mark why did you read it yourself :( man?! Really dissapointed about the story too. It just doest clear what it is trying to say.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

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not as expected,not at all engaging.

It's not engaging needs more substance. not as powerful as title says it's fucked book

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

60 mins of actionable ideas in a 7 hour wrapper

Manson is fun to listen to, but it just doesn't feel like there is enough depth of content to truly challenge your perspective.

Maybe it's just that he's preaching to the choir, and that if you want to read this book, you won't get as much out of it as someone who doesn't want to.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Rushed undergraduate thesis constructed from blogs

This book is like the result of someone rushing to meet an undergraduate thesis deadline on a subject they know very little about. There’s no real structure or message, and the ideas presented lack depth of thought or analysis. It’s as though the author picked his favorite 20 unrelated publications and then condensed a few points from each one in to a single book. I think Manson was attempting to produce his own version of Sapiens by Yuval Harari but without the intellectual standing or knowledge to deliver.

Although I thought the Authors other work: “The Subtle Art of not giving a f*ck” was entertaining enough and worth a listen for the ‘millennial generation’, I’m sorry to say I don’t recommend this one at all. It’s not the worst book I’ve come across, but compared to his last work, I felt the author was trying too hard to be funny while the narration was mono-tone, badly paced and just plain boring.

Rather than hitting that pre-midlife crisis market, this one is more for the spoilt 14 year old who feels unloved because mummy and daddy got a divorce. I found most of the book was totally disengaging, especially the ‘how to start a religion’ section, as a non-religious person even I found this to be just unfunny rambling bluster (quite a few of Mansons 'jokes' have been circulating for some time...)

From what I can make out, the core of the book is that humans react because we have feelings, while also having a logical brain. No sh*t! This level of obviousness along with a general naivety was present throughout. For example, extremist thought is highlighted in the book to have many proposed factors and drivers, however the author quickly dismisses these and proceeds to reduce not being able to reason with extremists down to the absence of a powerful parent and therefore they are just being childish. Simple! All the world’s problems can be solved if only everyone read this book ….

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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Cop out

Very disapointed endless historic stories then rambling about AI WHY? Not impressedeo feel conned and it was a cop out to the required subject matter!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Good but not as good as subtle guide

it was a really good listen, makes lots of sense, obviously a clever thinker, but subtle guide was way ahead in terms of entertainment.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Not quite the subtle art....

‘The subtle art of not giving a f*ck’ was a great book. This..... not so much.

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Didn't enjoy it at all

I loved the first book, it really touched me and I listened to it twice. This was nothing in comparison, for me. I was hoping for something along the same lines but was really disappointed.

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dissapointed

a bit droney, lost interest a few times, not as good as the first book

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Well written and fun to read

I actually enjoyed this book more than I thought I would. It is well written and realised a laugh or two.

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  • MommaJ
  • 31-05-19

Good content, bad delivery

The book is good. I simply cannot listen to Mark Manson’s narration. I was left longing for the narrator from his previous book. Just too monotone for my adhd brain to stick with it. I needed the engagement of an expressive voice. Couldn’t even make it halfway through.

15 of 15 people found this review helpful

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  • Log Jammin
  • 17-05-19

5 star Philosophical soft-porn for the masses.

Read and masterfully delivered by the author, Manson constructs an easily digestible accessible philosophical jaunt through clever interpretations of Nietzsche and Kant as well as the Stoics.

Manson's path begins with his scribbling - in tiny print - The Uncomfortable Truth (essentially, that no matter how much we distract ourselves, the human condition is meaningless) on coffee cups for unsuspecting chain store customers, leads through a step-by-step "As Seen On TV" tutorial to create your very own religion, inevitably brings the reader to a conclusion that it's not because everything is f#cked that we need hope rather it's hope that needs everything to be f#cked, then explains how Edward Bernays channeled this truth with his Uncle Sigmund's conclusions to manipulate and convince the masses of their #fakefreedom while creating what is now the modern advertising economy.

Manson finally suggests that, “Instead of looking for hope, try this. Don’t hope. Don’t despair, either. In fact, don’t deign to believe you know anything...Don’t hope for better, just be better. Be something better. Be more compassionate, more resilient, more humble, more disciplined...— be a better human.”

My Audible experience was as enjoyable as Manson's previous entry into the pantheon of anti self-help self-help books and i found myself LLOL'ing (legitimately LOL'ing) enough to consider this work, much like life, a dramedy.

13 of 16 people found this review helpful

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  • Lindsay S. Nixon
  • 16-05-19

a string of ranty blog posts w/ a few good points

This isn't a "book" in my opinion. It's more of a collection of essays and ranty "blog posts" with maybe 1 or 2 academic-ish articles for HuffPo.

There are some parts of the 'book' that were well researched, provided excellent points and I thought to myself "oh wow" and "I'm going to have to read this again!!!" (30%) the rest was odd and didn't belong, despite Manson's best efforts to make it all fit. I feel like I read a string of ranty blog posts...

The writing also oscillates between deplorable to somewhat academic.

There are times where it reads like a polished, academic book (about 20%) but more often it is ranty blogging with slang like "Cray cray" and vulgar examples that Manson seems to slip in for shock value (except it doesn't work).

Manson is also a terrible narrator. His voice is bleh, but more alarming: he can't properly read his own writing--he can't deliver his own jokes and punchlines (!) It comes out awkward and unnatural-- making his "cray cray" and other slang even more distracting/weird.

12 of 15 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Dan Treuter
  • 01-06-19

Meh

Not as good as his previous book, but some interesting insights borrowed from Nietzsche and Kant.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Mk90
  • 16-05-19

Narrator is lacking.

I enjoyed Subtle Art alot due to pacing, this narrator lacks the charm and character.

13 of 17 people found this review helpful

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  • Utilisateur anonyme
  • 30-05-19

Know your past and you'll figure out your future

Another great book by Mark MANSON. It was such a joy ride listing to Mark analysing life, hope, nd religion. Loved the walk down memory lane approach, and very I'm very exited about our future...well, not too excited.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Utilisateur anonyme
  • 28-05-19

underwhelming

this book does not even compare to his last. although there are many good points in this book with the occasional good story, I never felt fully committed to this book. narrating is lacking and I basically listened for Sox hours only for the last hour to hear he is just getting ready for the terminator franchise to come to life . if you enjoyed his last book I cant say you will you enjoy this .

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Ryan Cooper
  • 28-05-19

Average

The sequel is never as good as the original,.... this book really falls short of my expectations ;(

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • kambache
  • 25-05-19

Title misleading

I loved "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck", so I was excited for this one, thinking the title was hysterical ironic. Sadley, I felt that much of the book was nothing more than a giant rant on everything with no actual solution to propose. Just more cliche rants about every class of human and the expected domination by robots.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Matt
  • 24-05-19

Meh

Just couldn’t get into it. Loved his Subtle art book but this just wasn’t on the same level for me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful