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Summary

Dying for a Drink is a true story of the chaos and hurt caused by an alcoholic. The author, telling her own story, writes of time spent in multiple rehabs, both in the United Kingdom and Sydney, Australia. She writes in the hope that her story will encourage other alcoholics and addicts (which can be anybody addicted to anything) - that they will see in their own stories the similarities rather than the differences. 

The memoir depicts her rapid decline after she crossed the ‘invisible line’ and shows how her loved ones were devastated by her behaviour - and how they lived in fear that this disease would lead to her death. It chronicles, too, her sense of freedom and surrender and hope amid the sobriety from which she is sharing her journey and the beginnings of relationships repaired, with both loved ones and self.

©2018 Amelia Baker (P)2019 Amelia Baker

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    1 out of 5 stars

God, I need a drink

If you have never read or listened to a book about addiction before you may think this has some substance. However the truth is, it’s banal dross. It screams self-indulgent drivel, and if the AuthorHouse fee to the writer included a copy editor she was conned. Apparently, god is also to blame, as he encouraged the writer to complete this book. It starts with a promise that it isn’t religious but that’s a lie, the dogma increases as the book progresses. Then just when you don’t think it can get any worse you get to chapter 10, and if you can tolerate that your reward is a rendition of Amazing Grace followed by some patronizing Christian ranting before the torture ends. No doubt the writing was very cathartic to the authors recovery but that doesn’t mean the general public should be subjected to it. I could recommend many books about excess and addiction from celebrity autobiographies to the everyday unfortunate abuser, all of whom could write or if they couldn't, got someone who could to tell their story. This book falls into neither category. I admire the narrator for reading it in a tone as irritating as the text.

5 people found this helpful

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Irritating

The narrator is awful. Not sure what nationality she is but the British accent is terrible, and pronouncing words such as "Edinburgh" in the most bazar way. The writer also repeats words, especially "sobbing". Terribly written.

1 person found this helpful

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One to avoid

The story is OK with many references to religion and god, which is fine if that's your sort of thing. However the narration is awful and sounds like an automated voice with many mispronounced words. Don't waste a credit on this.

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Ok if you are religious

Poorly written, I found my self getting annoyed at the repetitive language and the constant talk of God. Not good

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Heart Felt Memoire

I couldn't switch it off. Very honest account and well narrated. I hope this reaches the best seller list and she gets her dream. Highly recommended.