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The Lover's Portrait: An Art Mystery Audiobook

The Lover's Portrait: An Art Mystery: The Adventures of Zelda Richardson, Volume 2

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Publisher's Summary

Missing masterpieces, Nazi blackmailers and a pesky amateur sleuth.

When a Dutch art dealer hides the stock from his gallery - rather than turn it over to his Nazi blackmailer - he pays with his life, leaving a treasure trove of modern masterpieces buried somewhere in Amsterdam, presumably lost forever. That is, until American art history student Zelda Richardson sticks her nose in.

After studying for a year in the Netherlands, Zelda scores an internship at the prestigious Amsterdam Museum, where she works on an exhibition of paintings and sculptures once stolen by the Nazis, lying unclaimed in Dutch museum depots almost seventy years later. When two women claim the same portrait of a young girl entitled Irises, Zelda is tasked with investigating the painting's history and soon finds evidence that one of the two women must be lying about her past. Before she can figure out which one and why, Zelda learns about the Dutch art dealer's concealed collection. And that Irises is the key to finding it.

Her discoveries make her a target of someone willing to steal - and even kill - to find the missing paintings. As the list of suspects grows, Zelda realizes she has to track down the lost collection and unmask a killer if she wants to survive.

** One of The Displaced Nation's Top 36 Expat Fiction Picks of 2016 **

Set in present day and wartime Amsterdam, this captivating mystery is not just about stolen paintings, but also the lives that were stolen.

The perfect novel for those who love art, history and mysteries.

This amateur sleuth mystery describes the plight of homosexuals and Jewish artists in Europe during World War II, as well as the complexities inherent to the restitution of artwork stolen by the Nazis in the 1930s and 1940s.

©2016 Jennifer S. Alderson (P)2017 Jennifer S. Alderson

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    Happy reviewer 15/12/2017
    Happy reviewer 15/12/2017
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
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    Story
    "Gripping art mystery"

    This has all the ingredients of a great mystery story: plucky heroine, machiavellian villains, interesting background, and lost of twists and turns culminating in a gripping finale.
    The narration is good, with the narrator managing to take on the voices of the different characters and inject emotions of excitement, fear, frustration and anxiety into her reading.
    Recommended for fans of mysteries especially those with an interest in art.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • Megan
    new york
    11/02/18
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great art history mystery!"

    What a great art history mystery!!! This was such an interesting book about artwork lost during WWII being located and reunited with survivors and their families. Zelda was an incredibly dogged amateur investigator. Even though she did go a bit overboard and get herself into trouble at times she was determined as hell to find out what really happened. I admire that in a character. I loved Fredrick her compliant guy friend too. He was such a good sport. The whole process of reuniting paintings with their original owners seemed so tedious yet satisfying. The story about the painting Irises was just fascinating. It was heartbreaking, beautiful and tragic.
    There were parts of the book that were a bit drawn out like the museum meetings themselves and some of Zelda’s internal thoughts but nothing too extreme.
    This audiobook was well produced. The parts of all the Dutch characters were really well done as were those of all the other characters. Each one easy to understand while still being distinct.
    I’m excited to listen to the next book in the series. I look forward to seeing what else Zelda gets herself involved in.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • HABS
    01/02/18
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    Performance
    Story
    "Amazing thriller that will keep you on your sit!!!"

    Amazing job by the author putting every bit of the story together. The historical background of Amsterdam combined with a thrilling story of stolen pieces of art perfectly entwined...Only thing is it has a slow start. BUT stay there, DONT quit as it will just get better.

    While I didn't like how some of the characters were narrated, as I had to speed up the narration in some parts .Still think it was a decent job and very professionally done!

    I was voluntarily provided this free review copy audiobook by the author, narrator, or publisher.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • BOOKTALK WITH EILEEN
    southern California
    01/01/18
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Enjoy 'Nancy Drew' of Amsterdam in this Mystery"

    The teaser on the front cover gave me some idea where the story was going—One painting. Two claimants. Three murders. Isn’t that intriguing?

    What I particularly liked about this book is how the author weaves an excellent mystery around a time period and subject I rarely read about. It is quite the eye-opener. The author is familiar with her material from personal experience, living in Amsterdam. She also has degrees in art history and museum studies. With her journalist background, passion for writing, along with the credentials, she created a believable and cunning plot.

    I appreciated her story crafting, providing pieces of the mystery while keeping me guessing all along; the way she keeps the mystery unfolding; and the way she moves the reader from the 1940’s to the present as the mystery and suspense coil ever-tighter.

    I learned so much about how artists were able to ‘hide’ their work from the greed of those who would take what doesn’t belong to them. I didn’t feel the author pushed ‘history’ down my throat, rather it came as a by-product of the story unfolding. Well written!

    This story captures how times have changed, just some 80 years ago, people were much less accepting and tolerant of different life styles. We still struggle with this, however.

    I enjoy Zelda’s not-letting-anything-slide attitude with a bit of humor thrown in. She is quite the Nancy Drew of Amsterdam. I also enjoy her exuberance for getting into the Master’s program. I’m hoping Frederick and she will have a future. He is a true friend. Perhaps in a sequel?

    The story was a bit of a slow starter and the initial voice portrayed by Carol Purdom fell flat for me, that is, the voice for the museum’s project manager. However, her voice for the old woman who claims the painting is hers, and the belligerent curator reliving his past disappointments, has her doing an admirable job adding energy to the telling.

    All-in all, I enjoyed the sleuth and well-written plot.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Leslie F.
    03/12/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting book"

    I thought this was a really interesting book. I've always enjoyed art, but I didn't really know anything about establishing providence of a piece of art. This book takes you inside the business as Zelda works to uncover the mystery behind the painting, "Irises," as she works to return stolen artwork to its rightful owner. I thought the characters in this book were interesting and the mystery was well-thought-out. I listened to the Audible audio edition of this book. I thought the male characters sounded the same, but other than that, she did a good job. Overall, a good book. I'm looking forward to seeing more books in this series.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • tarafarah7: Tara Brown
    Grand Rapids, MI
    03/12/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Looking for your next book? Check this one out!!"

    The Lover's Portrait: An Art Mystery: The Adventures of Zelda Richardson, Volume 2 by Jennifer S. Alderson, narrated by Carol Purdom is an engaging, suspenseful listen! This audiobook is a clean Historical Mystery, and it falls into the International Crime and Mystery category. This is the first book I have read/listened to by Author Jennifer S. Alderson, so I wasn't sure what to expect regarding her writing style, but, WOW, am I impressed! It was immediately clear to me that quite a bit of time, energy, and research went in to writing The Lover's Portrait! I love books that have the main character playing the role of amateur sleuth; this one, however, felt different than the others I have listened to in the past. The excellent character development and sophisticated storyline gave it a more mature feel. In addition to being fully engaged in the plot, I was also on the edge of my seat, amazed, at how beautifully the words flowed together, which isn't always a common feeling I get with the English language. The outstanding word choice and vivid descriptions made me feel like was watching the events unfold before my very eyes. Watch out mystery authors, Jennifer S. Alderson has definitely upped the game! 

    The recording of this audiobook was perfectly clear and professional, free of any unnecessary breaks, pauses, or background (white) noise. This made for a pleasant listening experience. Carol Purdom's performance was good, but I don't think she did the book justice. She seemed to drag out her words, causing me to speed up the narration the first half of the book, which is something I rarely do. The overall tone of the piece sounded sad and depressing in places, and I don't think that was the author's intention. As I approached the second half of the book, I returned to the normal speed through to the end. However, I don't know if it was because she made a change in her style of narration or if it was because I was more used to hearing her. Either way, she didn't make this book shine in the way it deserved. By no means was her performance poor. In fact, I'm sure she is wonderful. I just don't feel this was the right book to show her true ability and talent as a narrator.

    Even though I obviously did things backwards by starting with Book 2, it didn't matter. I don't feel like I missed out on anything in Book 1 that made my overall experience with Book 2 confusing at all. I do, however, plan to now read Book 1 and possibly listen to this one again! :-) I greatly enjoyed this audiobook, and I recommend it to those who enjoy a complex mystery that keeps you guessing until the very end. If you have an appreciation for art, a love of history, or are an aspiring world traveller,  you will enjoy The Lover's Portrait: An Art Mystery: The Adventures of Zelda Richardaon, Volume 2 by Jennifer S. Alderson, narrated by Carol Purdom. I love to travel, explore, and learn about places I've never been, but with writing this good, I don't even need to leave the comfort of my own home. Thank you! 

    Thank you for reading my review. I hope it was helpful. :-)

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Victoria J. Mejia-Gewe
    Los Angeles, CA United States
    05/10/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Amazing book about Nazi art crime"

    Zelda, an expatriate from America in Amsterdam, desperately wants to get into a graduate program in museum design in The Lover's Portrait by Jennifer S. Alderson. However, Zelda's background gives her a low chance of getting into the program until her adviser recommends her as an intern for an exhibit on stolen Nazi art meant to help reunite looted art with its true owners. Helping the exhibition copy edit its website is not exactly her idea of a great internship, but she gets excited when a woman comes forward to claim a relatively cheap painting called Irises. Rita explains that the painting was named after her oldest sister while painted by the sister's first love. But being a Jew, he got sent away to a concentration camp and Iris became a hunted woman, so Rita's father sent his wife and daughters to America. His last letter to the family indicated that he had found a hiding place for his priceless art and had paid the rent on their home for the next five years. Then they never heard from him again. In joy, Rita is thrilled to be reunited with the portrait of his sister last seen over 70 years ago.

    In joy over this occurrence, the museum announces the first reunion between art and owner at its exhibit's opening, but the next day a new claimant steps forward to say that Rita does not have the right to the painting but that instead Rita's father sold the painting to the new claimant's grandfather. Karen, the widow of a New York tycoon, and her lawyer explain that Karen only just learned from her mother on her deathbed that her mother's real father was Arjan van Heemsvliet, killed a couple months after his wedding to his pregnant wife, who escaped to America and married a man who gave the baby his own name. But that makes Karen the true claimant, and she has the gallery ledgers to prove it.

    The proprietor, Huub, wants to award the portrait to Karen immediately, but the project manager, Bernice, insists on doing at least minimal research into the claim. With all the research department on vacation after a long and exhausting period of preparing for this exhibit, the only one left to do any work is Zelda, who is thrilled to get to do real research. This leads her into plenty of legitimate research but also poorly judged initiative that she takes.

    This book gripped my interest through the entire course of listening to it. I really enjoyed the details of all the research into the provenance of art as well as all the periodic flashbacks to Amsterdam 1942, in the middle of the war. It made the realities of those living through the war become so much more vivid. The details of the characters' natures came through interestingly as well.

    Carol Purdom performs the audio edition of this book and helps to keep the book moving very quickly. She reads in a comfortable voice that enlivens the book and kept me listening nonstop to the book.

    I was highly impressed by The Lover's Portrait. I'm not interested in art in general, but that did not prevent me from being drawn to this book. Further, I only noticed halfway through that this is the second book in a series, but that wasn't even apparent from the book. I give this incredible book five stars!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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