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Summary

Penguin presents the audiobook edition Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World, written and read by Anand Giridharadas. 

The New York Times best seller. 

What explains the spreading backlash against the global elite? In this revelatory investigation, Anand Giridharadas takes us into the inner sanctums of a new gilded age, showing how the elite follow a 'win-win' logic, fighting for equality and justice any way they can - except ways that threaten their position at the top. 

But why should our gravest problems be solved by consultancies, technology companies and corporate-sponsored charities instead of public institutions and elected officials? Why should we rely on scraps from the winners? Trenchant and gripping, this is an indispensable guide and call to action for elites and citizens alike.

©2019 Anand Giridharadas (P)2019 Penguin Books Ltd

Critic reviews

"Entertaining and gripping.... For those at the helm, the philanthropic plutocrats and aspiring 'change agents' who believe they are helping but are actually making things worse, it's time for a reckoning with their role in this spiraling dilemma." (Joseph Stiglitz, New York Times Book Review)

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What listeners say about Winners Take All

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Disappointing

This book could have been an important polemic but unfortunately the writer makes his arguments through the lives of a dozen or so people and the result is slow moving and in places more than a little boring. I don't want to hear about the life experiences of people I don't know. I got tired of hearing 'he said, she said' and frequently wound forward. Where he does talk in more general or historical terms it is good but that is only a small part of the book.

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Enjoyable, but fails to address the problem

The world is being played by the rich. Those that don't care about consequences and those that do. Anand opens our eyes to the world of those rich people that supposedly do care about the consequences, but the status quo is too big and too costly to change. What then can change the system and bring about the change needed to address the stark imbalance between the haves and have nots? This book doesn't go there, but at least goes to address stage 1 of recovery, that if not being in denial.

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Way toooooooooo long

Interesting premise but should be a long article not a very long book. Read summary online rather than reading the book.

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amazing!

great book about the false win win mentality many powerful people claim to be working for

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Brave, thoughtful, urgent

An unflinching look at the ever more complete capture of power and decision making by the wealthy

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Read it

A book that all should read irrespective of whether you agree with the writer or not. A good investment of a few pounds (£).

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Everyone should hear this book

important book, should be required reading for all. Philanthropy is marketing of an evil system.

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I had no idea...

To say that this was a revelation is not hyperbole on my part. I've often wondered why the so-called 'I-Specialists', rampant on social media kep telling us of the almost single-handed efforts to fix the world whilst making money haven't actually fixed anything.

Now I understand better and can see more clearly.

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Review

I was saw impressed i bought 2 hard copies for my friends. It is an area not yet explored

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Thought provoking critique

Clearly narrated. Well explained. Conscise in-depth explanations without labouring the points. Relevant to anybody who wants to understand today's society and some of the issues we face.

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  • Daniel
  • 31-12-19

Repetitive and narrow minded

Some elements of his ideas are of course universal like equal opportunity for all and that billionaires are biased and live in a bubble. However claiming Trump is a racist or white supremacist as he is against illegal immigration is self indulgent adolescent narcissism. The author is as biased as a news anchor and the premise of the book is spread too thinly over too many chapters. I think billionaire philanthropy being an ironic contradiction in terms was probably already obvious to most people. Good to listen to if you want to hear what the 'woke' think, and increasing opportunities for middle and working class Americans is something I think most people agree on.

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  • Christian R. Unger
  • 06-11-20

Starts strong and finishes in nothingness

The first 3-4 hours are great, interesting points are made and intriguing discussion occurs. But then the author ran out of point, and thus pursued illustrating the same issues over and over and not even in a way that frankly becomes more than a bit boring.

Fantastic topic, but structured badly. The first half is probably worth the price of admission, but after that play it by ear. Especially grating is the epilogue which loops back to something discussed much earlier which made me skip the last ten minutes entirely.

Still important and definitely worth a listen. Makes its point maybe too concisely and then tries to keep it going.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 03-09-20

Eye opening, startling...

can't believe what Anand managed to uncover and I also can't believe how little power the public domain has.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 08-11-19

very good, scary and depressing

this book really opened my eyes to the hypocrisy of the philanthropic rich. it is such a shame we can't focus on bettering our world civilisation instead of funneling progress and productivity you to the 1%. What are we doing that allows 8 people have the same wealth as the bottom 50% of the world.