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When She Was Gone

Narrated by: Liam Hourican
Series: David Dunnigan, Book 2
Length: 8 hrs and 39 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)

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Summary

The gripping, fast-paced thriller from best-selling author S. A. Dunphy.

When criminologist David Dunnigan receives the shocking delivery of one of his niece Beth's shoes, it reignites the 18-year-old investigation into her disappearance - which Dunnigan has always blamed himself for. But is he ready for what he might find?

New evidence links Beth's abduction to an antiquated psychiatric hospital and on to an Inuit village in the frozen north of Greenland, where the parents of Harry, a homeless boy Dunnigan and his friend Miley rescued from the streets, may have been trafficked.

Can Dunnigan survive the hunt, and will he find Beth after all this time?

©2018 S. A. Dunphy (P)2018 Hachette Books Ireland

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I'm just sad it's over

brilliant couldbr stop listeistening finished
it in two days. just as good as the first book

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  • david
  • 29-03-18

Silly Book

One defense of this book might be that it was written for young people, who have yet to gain understanding of how grownups talk and behave, and what kinds of events are just too laughably implausible to put in a book. But if that were the case, why would there be so many pointlessly gruesome scenes? Of course, any work of fiction can fairly ask the reader to suspend disbelief. I felt that this one was asking me to be a drooling idiot, and I just had to turn it off.

The reader had some good moments, but had a habit of starting chapters in a louder voice, then trailing off, then coming back louder, etc. If you are listening in a car, this means you are constantly adjusting the volume.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful