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Summary

An effortless approach that turns the body into a fat-burning machine.

Is it possible to eat well, drink wine, and still lose weight? Melanie Avalon is living proof that, heck yeah, it's not only possible, it's unbelievably simple and straightforward. It's all about the what (mostly paleo, but she's not a monster about it), the when (believe it or not, brief fasting can mean freedom rather than restriction), and the wine (red wine can be a secret bullet for weight loss). It's a combination that Avalon discovered after years of self-experimentation and intense research on the mechanics of body fat regulation.

In What When Wine, Avalon shares her journey to a healthier lifestyle, with the tips and tricks she learned along the way, as well as a jump-start plan including 50 delicious paleo-friendly, gluten-free recipes by chef Ariane Resnick.

©2018 Melanie Avalon (P)2019 Tantor

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Such a shame!

So there is some good information in this book, which is why it's such a shame, that all of it is tainted by the annoying way the author has attempted to drown her book in internet speak. Honestly, I lost track of the number of times she uses the phrase "hashtag", "oh hai" or "all the things". They are overused ad nauseum. She's trying so very hard to be funny that she drowns out the content of her book, which is a shame because there is some great content in here. There are times when she doesn't do this and it's markedly better and easier to listen to. The reader of the audio book tries desperately to translate the humour, that the author intends, with her every other sentence joke/slang but it just makes for deeply cringeworthy and painful listening. I read a lot of non-fiction, and a self confessed audio addict. I recently listened to "The History of Drunkeness" which is factual and yet hilarious. I genuinely have no objection at all to a non-fiction book attempting to be funny, but this one just fails. It's like the author doesn't realise that a blog style of writing just doesn't work for an entire book. Not to mention that internet speak and jargon rapidly evolves so that saying "hashtag" constantly is already lame and overdone.

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