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We Are the Weather

Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast
Narrated by: Jonathan Safran Foer
Length: 5 hrs and 6 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (82 ratings)

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Summary

Brought to you by Penguin.

From the best-selling author of Eating Animals and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - a brilliant, fresh take on climate change and what we can do about it. 

Climate crisis is the single biggest threat to human survival. And it is happening right now. We all understand that time is running out - but do we truly believe it? And, caught between the seemingly unimaginable and the apparently unthinkable, how can we take the first step towards action, to arrest our race to extinction?   

We can begin with our knife and fork. The link between farming animals and the climate crisis is barely discussed, because giving up our meat-based diets feels like an impossible ask. But we don't have to go cold turkey. Cutting out animal products for just part of the day is enough to change the world.   

The task of saving the planet will involve a great reckoning with ourselves - with our all-too-human reluctance to sacrifice immediate comfort for the sake of the future. But we have done it before and we can do it again. Collective action is the way to save our home and way of life. And it all starts with what we eat, and don't eat, for breakfast.  

With his distinctive wit, insight and humanity, Jonathan Safran Foer presents the essential debate of our time as no one else could, bringing it to vivid and urgent life and offering us all a much-needed way out.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio on our desktop site.

©2019 Jonathan Safran Foer (P)2019 Penguin Audio

What listeners say about We Are the Weather

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  • Overall
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essential reading

an accessible exploration of the climate crisis, what must be done, and why individual action does matter. told through personal anecdotes, and a western take on thinking about the crisis.

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Must read

An excellent, eloquent case for practical action to contrast climate change. The prose is at times overlaboured and the rhetoric a bit heavy-handed, but overall it was a compelling read

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A beautiful book

I came upon this book by accident. It is beautifully written and passionately read. I am going to recommend this to all of my friends and family. And I will reduce my consumption of meat and dairy from this moment on. Thank you

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but how should be act?

some good points are hidden in there, but an awful lot of making the listener feel guilty and not a lot of solutions

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Good book

Enoyed it very much. Well written and left me with greater gratitude for ice, snow and storms here in Iceland.

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beautifully written. thought provoking perspective

I listened in audible. will buy the book to read as well. I think he is a great writer...very honest. very thought provoking and a different perspective on climate change. ...but the book is much more than that. it's a great read.

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He loses me towards the end.

Beautiful book. But I’m confused as to what Foer’s message is? I’m not even sure if it’s dystopian or hopefull? Maybe a bit of both?

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Wasn't really about food and climate...

Although the book was nice, it was far more about the mindsets and philosophies with which we must view the climate crisis than the impact of flexitarianism on planet (which is why I bought this book). There wasn't much info on that and although the rest of the book was quite good it wasnt about the topic. There were some chapters where the author is talking to his internal monologue and I don't know if it a) didn't work at all b) went on for too long or C) didn't translate in audio form, but either way I did skip a chapter because I couldn't listen to it anymore. Overall decent book with some issues, primerily it not being about what it says it is about.

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Truly inspiring and captivating

It's both captivating and terrifying. I have already used many of its arguments to convince my family to eat No Animal Products Before Dinner. and it has further inspired me to make more changes to my already changed lifestyle. The writing is easy to follow yet deep. The book makes you understand the need for collective effort and help you talk about the climate crisis.

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Well read but feels like a padded out attempt to say one thing

It’s well read and well written but its discussion of climate change offers little that is new or insightful, other than the central premise which is that a solution is to stop eating animal products: a statement which, once made, is reiterated without much further illumination. Once I’d completed the first half of what is already quite a short book I felt that there was little else of real value here. I enjoy and appreciate his intelligence and humane approach to writing. But after the first hour it felt repetitive and unnecessary.