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Unveiled

How Western Liberals Empower Radical Islam
Narrated by: Yasmine Mohammed
Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
5 out of 5 stars (9 ratings)

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Summary

Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel meets The Handmaid's Tale.

Since September 11, 2001, the Western world has been preoccupied with Islam and its role in terrorism. Yet, public debate about the faith is polarized. One camp praises "the religion of peace", while the other claims all Muslims are terrorists. Canadian human rights activist Yasmine Mohammed believes both sides are dangerously wrong.

In Unveiled: How Western Liberals Empower Radical Islam, Yasmine speaks her truth as a woman born in the Western world yet raised in a fundamentalist Islamic home. Despite being a first-generation Canadian, she never felt at home in the West. And even though she attended Islamic schools and wore the hijab since age nine, Yasmine never fit in with her Muslim family, either. With one foot in each world, Yasmine is far enough removed from both to see them objectively, yet close enough to see them honestly.

Part Ayaan Hirsi Ali's Infidel, part The Handmaid's Tale, Yasmine's memoir takes listeners into a world few Westerners are privy to. As a college educator for over 15 years, Yasmine's goal is to unveil the truth. Is FGM Islamic or cultural? Is the hijab forced or a choice? Is ISIS a representation of "true" Islam or a radical corruption? And why is there so much conflicting information? Like most insular communities, the Islamic world has both an "outside voice" and an "inside voice". It's all but impossible for bystanders to get a straight answer.

Without telling anyone what to believe, Unveiled navigates the rhetoric and guides truth-seekers through media narratives, political correctness, and outright lies while encouraging listeners to come to their own conclusions.

©2019 Yasmine Mohammed (P)2019 Yasmine Mohammed

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

A moving and much needed wake up call to libs.

Truly shines a light on the reality of millions of girls living under the oppressive boot of Islam. This is a wake up call for liberals who choose to ignore vile behaviours in the name of embracing diversity. It is especially poignant as Yasmine reads this herself and you can feel every second of her agony - I cried often but this is ultimately an uplifting story of a woman who escaped the torture and is now fighting to save other women from the same fate. I would recommend this book to anyone who thinks they are open mInded and tolerant about religious beliefs as sometimes your tolerance helps to resign women in theocracies (and even in Western countries) to a life of patriarchal oppression that you would never accept for yourself.

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    5 out of 5 stars

what an amazing woman!

I have been waiting so long for this book to come to audible and was very excited when it fjnally did. Yasmine is an inspirational and strong woman who tells a very important story. I highly recommend this book, to Muslim women, to feminists but also to westerners in general, especially to the ones that don't know much about Islam or what it is like growing up in a deeply religious and suppresive environment. It is a story that needed to be told and heard by many. Hopefully it will lead to greater understanding and support for those in need.

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  • Race Hochdorf
  • 07-02-20

Best Ex-Muslim Memoir Since Hirsi Ali’s “Infidel”

***May Contain Spoilers***

Every human rights advocate, humanist, and progressive should read “Unveiled”, and it is telling that mainstream media does not elevate this book and praise its author from the rooftops (contrast the silence around Yasmine with the glowing reception of Megan Phelps Roper of the Westboro Baptist Church).

Yasmine begins her story describing the cruel and unbearable treatment she endured as a child in a strict fundamentalist Muslim “family”. I put family in quotations because-- as Yasmine herself states-- she never had a true family as a child. Her mother had readily traded any maternal instinct she may have had for religious zealotry, and was complicit in the abuse Yasmine received by her uncle and (later) her jihadist husband. Her sister, Yasmine states, was a drone. Mindlessly carrying out her tasks and accepting-- with glee-- her “role” in Islam where she did not have to think or worry about life’s big questions, and her brother was unstable.

Yasmine had no one.

Even more angering is the impotent response Yasmine received from the Canadian justice system when she first tried to escape. Her abuse, a court decided, was a “cultural issue”.

I won’t lie, I haven’t so thoroughly despised a character in nonfiction more than Yasmine’s mother since Amon Goeth in Schindler’s List. As if Yasmine's childhood was not traumatizing enough, her mother exerts such a strong psychological control over her in early adulthood that she’s forced to marry an Al-Qaeda fighter (who the mother was also trying to have an affair with). This woman was a criminal, and she escaped justice.

What I love about this book, and particularly the audio version, is how the reader feels the emotions along with Yasmine. As cliche as this statement is, you really do feel as if you are there, as her, experiencing everything. When she finally breaks free then-- of Islam, of fundamentalism, of her terrible mother-- you breathe this huge sigh of relief as if it’s your life. Can’t recommend this book highly enough. If you’ve enjoyed other memoirs like Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s “Infidel”, Frank McCourt’s “Angela’s Ashes”, or Ta Nehisi Coates’ “Between The World & Me”, “Unveiled” is for you.

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  • LilSweetLin
  • 09-02-20

Read or listen to this book... NOW.

I've been a follower of Yasmine on Twitter for a while now. I've seen many an interview she's given and loved the well-spoken, succinct way in which she speaks on the subject of not only hijab, but of true feminism in general, across the religious and ideological spectrum. In following her and learning of her story, I was amazed at how similar our life experiences are to a degree; she, an ex-Muslim, and I, as an admittedly lax (and stubborn) Jewish woman with a feminist bent, with a customarily "traditional" ethnic Jewish family. What can be said about this book, except, MIND BLOWN.

I'd planned on getting a hard copy of this book, but given that I love Yasmine's ability to thoroughly convey her message with her voice, I opted for the audio book. I'm so glad I did, The passion with which she read her own words made me as the listener run through the gamut of emotions; from anger to outrage; disappointment and sadness; (which led to the inevitable tears); to points of wry laughter and saying, "I know, right?! and, "Tell me about it."

What I loved about this book is that it was as if Yasmine was right there with you, taking you into her confidence and treating you as her trusted friend, as she poured out her heart and soul. She doesn't talk *at* you, but *to* you, in the sincere hopes that you'd take all she says in with an open heart and an open mind, This included researched facts and figures, as well as references to real world news examples of women who have fallen real victim to "the death shroud", as she calls it; especially at the hands of those that these women were supposed to depend on, but instead lived in fear of. Because she is so thorough, however, she also made mention of the men and boys who have also suffered at the hands of Islam-- whether it be through being LGBT or through apostasy--both of which are punishable by death.

There was many a point in my day of listening that I wished I could hug her, and reassure her that she was not alone. And indeed she isn't, I commend Yasmine for having both the bravery and the courage to write and narrate this book, It takes a good amount of both to be willing to open that obviously *very* sensitive Pandora's box, especially among Muslims themselves, who are so conditioned and indoctrinated through a fear of "G_d", that they follow blindly. Those that do question, unfortunately suffer in silence, fearing being ostracized by both family and community at large. It is these people that must be shown the light/ empowered.

Instead, Yasmine points out that Western feminists, the far Left and corporations, in their attempts to veil their own racism and/or assuage their own guilt, have made the hijab into a symbol of "beauty" and "empowerment" here at home, while brave women around the world are being imprisoned for decades, tortured, and even killed for daring to remove it. Yasmine closes her book by pointing out this dangerous hypocrisy. Religious modesty is NOT feminism, nor does it protect one from being raped or subject to violence or slut shaming. When the ultimate goal of fundamentalist religion is subjugation and surrender, no society can be TRULY free.

Love you, Yasmine. 10 stars.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 04-03-20

Heart-breaking and Inspiring

Thank you for revealing the truth of Islam. This is an essential read for absolutely everyone.

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  • Cynthia Welch
  • 21-02-20

Speak your truth, regardless of what tribe it might offend

Living in the US, you get caught up in the “liberalism”, the “wokeness”, of those around you. This book is perfect to remind all of us that fighting ideas is not the same as fighting people. Yasmine has inspired me to think more critically and have the difficult conversations I’ve been avoiding.

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  • PlanetMimosa
  • 20-02-20

Bravery in the raw

I cannot explain the eye-opening experience this book is at its core. Thank you to the author. This book has something each woman in the world can relate to, and shows the power within us as a whole. I’m inspired.

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  • Joshua
  • 16-02-20

a powerful and inspiring book

this book is enjoyable and easy to listen to. very informative and a perspective that you're not going to receive in other books. I highly recommend you listen to this book

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  • Anonymous User
  • 10-02-20

Stunning. Prepare to be brought to tears.

This book captures the pain that Muslim women undergo because of their culture and religion. Society has much to gain by hearing the numerous stories and of women like Yasmine Mohammed.

To Yasmine: Thank you for putting your story into words so the world can hear it.