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Unsolved Child Murders

Eighteen American Cases, 1956-1998
Narrated by: Pamela Almand
Length: 9 hrs and 11 mins
5.0 out of 5 stars (2 ratings)

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Summary

An estimated 800,000 children are reported missing each year in the United States. Only one in 10,000 are found dead. Yet unsolved child murders are almost a daily occurrence - of nearly 52,000 juvenile homicides between 1980 and 2008, more than 20 percent remain open. Drawing on FBI reports, police and court records, and interviews with victims’ families, this book provides details and evidence for 18 unsolved cases from 1956 to 1998.

©2018 Emily G. Thompson (P)2019 by Blackstone Publishing

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  • 31-08-20

Good overview

If you are looking for a good overview of cases both well known and overlooked this might be a good book for you. What struck me at this time of BLM is the “white child in danger” syndrome present in this book and so many others. I don’t think the author intended to exclude cases involving children of color but she has and that enforces an incorrect notion that white suburban children are the predominant victims of crime and the only ones worthy of our empathy. The book also consistently evokes community fear about crime which is greatly overblown when compared to the very real fear that minority communities suffer every day. I’m not intending a screed here but as times change it’s important we consider a more universal look at the criminal justice system and go beyond the white view only.

8 people found this helpful