Listen free for 30 days

Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Buy Now for £9.99

Buy Now for £9.99

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

A heart-breaking and hilarious memoir about the author’s fight to be true to themself.

Winner of A Somerset Maugham Award. 

Shortlisted for the Polari First Book Prize 2020.

From a god-fearing Muslim boy enraptured with their mother, to a vocal, queer drag queen estranged from their family, this is a heart-breaking and hilarious memoir about the author’s fight to be true to themself....

Amrou knew they were gay when, aged 10, they first laid eyes on Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone. It was love at first sight. Amrou’s parents weren’t so happy.... 

From that moment on, Amrou began searching in all the wrong places for ways to make their divided self whole again. Unicorn is a hilarious yet devastating story of a search for belonging, following the painful and surprising process of transforming from a god-fearing Muslim boy to a queer drag queen, strutting the stage in seven-inch heels and saying the things nobody else dares to.... 

©2019 Amrou Al-Kadhi (P)2019 HarperCollins Publishers Limited

Critic reviews

"It should be [shared] far and wide." (Ian McKellen)

"This book is as rare, fabulous and beautiful as the creature it is named for. A masterpiece of psychology, a major study of Islam and a definitive study of drag, it made me cry, it made me rage and it made me hoot. Full of anger, insight and philosophy, along with some cracking great gags, this is a magnificent and essential document of the 21st century. It moved my heart and soul." (Russell T. Davies)

"A heartbreaking, healing book. it will make you better." (Simon Amstell)

What listeners say about Life as a Unicorn

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    103
  • 4 Stars
    31
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    99
  • 4 Stars
    27
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    100
  • 4 Stars
    21
  • 3 Stars
    11
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

WOW!

"Unicorn" is both heart-warming and heart-breaking at the same time.
This astounding memoir gives a voice seldom heard, of a Queer, Drag Queen Muslim non-binary person. It managed to break my heart one moment and the next, swell with happiness.
I cannot stress enough how important this read is.
TW: homophobia, sexual assault.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Funny and heartbreaking

Gave me a new way to look at drag. It also shows the reader a glimpse of the complexities of the feelings many religious lgbtqi+ experience as well as Middle Eastern immigrants. And wonderful descriptions and thoughts around OCD.
It even contains life lessons for me, a white cis-het woman.
Amrou is honest, open, and a very reflected writer.

The only small thing, not even negative really, is that their voice is so relaxing it difficult to keep focused when listening for long periods (hours).

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

What a story!

I need a sit down. What a ride. Has to be listened to be believed.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Just press play! Fantastic to listen to

Loved it! Thanks to Amrou for sharing and performing their story with the rest of us.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Life As A Unicorn

I listened to 𝗟𝗜𝗙𝗘 𝗔𝗦 𝗔 𝗨𝗡𝗜𝗖𝗢𝗥𝗡 (previously published as Unicorn) by Amrou Al-Kadhi as an audiobook 🎧📖
-
𝗜'𝘃𝗲 𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗺𝘆 𝘄𝗵𝗼𝗹𝗲 𝗹𝗶𝗳𝗲 𝗳𝗲𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗹𝗶𝗸𝗲 𝗜 𝗱𝗼𝗻'𝘁 𝗯𝗲𝗹𝗼𝗻𝗴. 𝗔𝘀 𝗮 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝗲𝗿 𝗯𝗼𝘆 𝗶𝗻 𝗜𝘀𝗹𝗮𝗺 𝗰𝗹𝗮𝘀𝘀, 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝗴𝗼𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝗛𝗲𝗹𝗹 𝗯𝗲𝗰𝗮𝘂𝘀𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗜 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗶𝗻𝘀𝗶𝗱𝗲 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗮 𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆 𝗿𝗲𝗮𝗹 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗽𝗲𝘁𝘂𝗮𝗹 𝗮𝗻𝘅𝗶𝗲𝘁𝘆 ... 𝗜'𝘃𝗲 𝗹𝗶𝘃𝗲𝗱 𝗯𝗲𝘁𝘄𝗲𝗲𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗠𝗶𝗱𝗱𝗹𝗲 𝗘𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗟𝗼𝗻𝗱𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝗳𝗲𝗹𝘁 𝘁𝗼𝗼 𝗴𝗮𝘆 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗜𝗿𝗮𝗾𝗶𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗼𝗼 𝗜𝗿𝗮𝗾𝗶 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗴𝗮𝘆𝘀.
-
Life As A Unicorn is Al-Kadhi's biography, telling the story of their life, from growing up as a young gay boy who wanted to join the theatre, to their being confidently out and performing as a drag queen for the whole world to see and appreciate.
Al Kadhi's account is heartbreaking at times, and I felt so much empathy for them and their reflections on realising they were gay from a young age, even though they knew their family would not be happy with this revelation.
-
𝗜 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝘀𝗺𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗴𝗼𝗼𝗳𝗶𝗹𝘆, 𝗮𝗻𝗱, 𝗮𝘀 𝗜 𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗻𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗺𝘆 𝗺𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿, 𝗜 𝗰𝗼𝘂𝗹𝗱 𝘀𝗲𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘀𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝗼𝗼 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗲𝗻𝗷𝗼𝘆𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗳𝗼𝗿𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝘄𝗼 𝗶𝗻𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝘂𝘀, 𝗹𝗼𝘃𝗲𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝗲𝗻𝘀.
'𝗠𝘂𝗺𝗺𝗮'𝘀 𝗲𝗻𝗷𝗼𝘆𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘁𝗼𝗼. 𝗠𝗮𝘆𝗯𝗲 𝗻𝗼𝘁 𝗯𝗲𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗮 𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗹𝘆 𝗯𝗼𝘆 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗯𝗲 𝗼𝗸 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗠𝘂𝗺𝗺𝗮.'
𝗜𝘁 𝘀𝗲𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗶𝗻 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝘀𝗲𝗰𝗿𝗲𝘁 𝗰𝗹𝘂𝗯, 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝘀𝗲 𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝘄𝗮𝘆𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝗯𝗲𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝘁𝗼𝗹𝗲𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗱. 𝗖𝗲𝗹𝗲𝗯𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗱, 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗻. 𝗣𝗲𝗿𝗵𝗮𝗽𝘀 𝗜 𝗵𝗮𝗱 𝗻𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗿𝘆 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁.
𝗕𝘂𝘁, 𝗮𝘀 𝗜 𝘄𝗼𝘂𝗹𝗱 𝘀𝗵𝗼𝗿𝘁𝗹𝘆 𝗹𝗲𝗮𝗿𝗻, 𝗠𝘂𝗺𝗺𝗮'𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗺𝘆 𝗯𝘂𝗯𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗴𝗼𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝗯𝘂𝗿𝘀𝘁.
-
Al-Kadhi bravely shares their litany of experiences growing up, attempting to come to terms with their sexuality and gender, and finding ways to cope however they can. Unfortunately these coping mechanisms were not always very healthy.
I'm glad to know that Al-Kadhi has a relationship with their parents now, but it's pretty clear to anyone reading/listening to Life As A Unicorn that when they were young, they were subjected to psychological abuse from their parents.
It's not unusual for any child who has been through some form of abuse to develop OCD, or to seriously focus their attention on schoolwork, as this is something that to some degree they have control over, to counteract the things happening that they can't control.
However, Al-Kadhi's experiences of OCD were pretty extreme, and their OCD dominated much of their existence throughout their schooling and education.
-
𝗜 𝗰𝗼𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗻𝘂𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗺𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝗮𝗰𝗮𝗱𝗮𝗺𝗶𝗰 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗺𝘆 𝗺𝗶𝘀𝘀𝗶𝗼𝗻, 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗽𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘀𝗵𝗲𝗱 𝗺𝘆𝘀𝗲𝗹𝗳 𝘄𝗵𝗲𝗻𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿 𝗜 𝗳𝗲𝗹𝗹 𝘀𝗵𝗼𝗿𝘁, 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗜 𝗵𝗮𝗱 𝗮𝗻 𝗮𝗰𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗻𝗲𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝘀𝗵𝗼𝘄 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗹𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝗺𝗲.
𝗜𝘁 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝗻𝗹𝘆 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗰𝗼𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗱𝗶𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗲𝗹𝘀𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗹𝗱 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝘁𝗲𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗺𝗲.
𝗧𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝘂𝗻𝗵𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵𝘆 𝗱𝗿𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗶𝘀 𝗻𝗼𝘁 𝘂𝗻𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝗺𝗼𝗻𝗴 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝗲𝗿 𝗽𝗲𝗼𝗽𝗹𝗲 ... 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗮𝘀 𝗮 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝗲𝗿 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗼𝗻, 𝗶𝘁 𝗶𝘀 𝗮 𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗹 𝗰𝗲𝗿𝘁𝗮𝗶𝗻𝘁𝘆 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝘄𝗶𝗹𝗹 𝗯𝗲 𝗵𝗶𝘁 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗳𝗲𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗵𝗮𝘃𝗲 𝗳𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗲𝗱 - 𝗯𝘆 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗳𝗮𝗺𝗶𝗹𝘆, 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗚𝗼𝗱, 𝗼𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝘀𝗼𝗰𝗶𝗲𝘁𝘆 - 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗿𝗮𝗰𝗸 𝗶𝗻 𝘆𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗯𝗲𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗰𝗮𝘂𝘀𝗲𝘀, 𝗵𝗼𝘄𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿 𝘀𝗺𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗼𝗿 𝗯𝗶𝗴, 𝗰𝗮𝗻 𝗯𝗿𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗶𝘁 𝗮 𝗱𝗿𝗶𝘃𝗲 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗲𝘅𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗺𝗮𝗿𝗸𝗲𝗿𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝘀𝘂𝗰𝗰𝗲𝘀𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗺𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁 𝘀𝗼𝗺𝗲𝗵𝗼𝘄 𝗿𝗲𝗽𝗮𝗶𝗿 𝗶𝘁.
-
Religion is always a complicated topic for LGBTQIA+ people, regardless of the religion.
Al-Kadhi talks about their experience with Islam, both in school, with their family, and also how they have embraced a new found appreciation for Islam as they have gotten older.
Often teachers of religion can instill fear in young people, with claims of Hell and eternal damnation as a kind of blackmail to make children conform, but it is wonderful to know that Al-Kadhi has been able to unlearn some of the untruths that were told to them as a child.
-
𝗔𝗻𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗺𝗮𝗱𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗻 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗵𝗼𝗿𝗿𝗶𝗳𝗶𝗰 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗶𝗻 𝗜𝘀𝗹𝗮𝗺 𝗰𝗹𝗮𝘀𝘀 𝘄𝗲 𝗵𝗮𝗱 𝗮𝗹𝘀𝗼 𝗯𝗲𝗲𝗻 𝘁𝗮𝘂𝗴𝗵𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗶𝗳 𝘄𝗲 𝗵𝗮𝗱 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝘀𝗶𝗻𝘀 𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗹𝗲𝗳𝘁 𝘀𝗵𝗼𝘂𝗹𝗱𝗲𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝗻 𝗴𝗼𝗼𝗱 𝗱𝗲𝗲𝗱𝘀 𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗿𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁 𝗯𝘆 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝗶𝗺𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘄𝗲 𝗱𝗶𝗲𝗱, 𝗻𝗼𝘁 𝗼𝗻𝗹𝘆 𝘄𝗼𝘂𝗹𝗱 𝘄𝗲 𝗯𝗲 𝘀𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗲𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝘁𝗼𝗿𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗲, 𝗯𝘂𝘁 𝘀𝗼 𝘄𝗼𝘂𝗹𝗱 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗺𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿𝘀 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗳𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘂𝘀.
-
Al-Kadhi also candidly talks about their race dysphoria, and how they have struggled to find their place even within the LGBTQIA+ community - they weren't always in healthy romantic or sexual relationships, and due to their own internalised shame weren't always able to support other LGBTQIA+ friends around them.
However, their journey to gender euphoria isn't all doom and gloom. Some of their anecdotes and stories are genuinely funny, and moving, and interesting.
-
𝗔𝗳𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗮 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗹𝗼𝗻𝗴𝗲𝗱 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗵𝘆𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗯𝗼𝗹𝗶𝗰 𝗺𝘂𝘀𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗹 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗼𝗱𝘂𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 - 𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗼𝘄 𝗮 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝗲𝗻 𝗵𝗲𝗿 𝟭𝟱 𝗺𝗶𝗻𝘂𝘁𝗲𝘀 - 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝗵𝗼𝘄 𝗯𝗲𝗴𝗮𝗻 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗲𝗮𝗰𝗵 𝗼𝗳 𝘂𝘀 𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗿𝗼𝘄𝗱 𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝗯𝘆 𝗼𝗻𝗲, 𝘂𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗹 𝗜 𝗽𝗶𝘃𝗼𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗮𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝗹𝗮𝘀𝘁. 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗻𝗲𝘅𝘁 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝘁 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝘀𝘂𝗽𝗽𝗼𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗯𝗲 𝗺𝗲 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗰𝗹𝗮𝗶𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗴, '𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗜𝘀𝗹𝗮𝗺', 𝗳𝗼𝗹𝗹𝗼𝘄𝗲𝗱 𝗯𝘆 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗠𝘂𝘀𝗹𝗶𝗺 𝗰𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝘁𝗼 𝗽𝗿𝗮𝘆𝗲𝗿 𝗿𝗲𝗺𝗶𝘅𝗲𝗱 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗟𝗮𝗱𝘆 𝗚𝗮𝗴𝗮'𝘀 𝗕𝗮𝗱 𝗥𝗼𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲
-
The ending of the book was perfect, and really highlights the difference that people can feel when they find where they belong.
From a place of love, and surrounded by our chosen family, a lot of past hurt can heal, and a lot of destructive behaviours can cease, allowing people to lead a genuinely happy and fulfilled life.
-
𝗜 𝗯𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗱 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝗹𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗳𝘂𝗹 𝗱𝗶𝘀𝗽𝗹𝗮𝘆 𝗼𝗳 𝗯𝗼𝗱𝗶𝗲𝘀, 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿𝘁𝘄𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼𝗴𝗲𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗿, 𝗲𝗮𝗰𝗵 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆 𝗼𝗻𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝘂𝘀 𝗳𝘂𝘀𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗶𝘁𝗮𝗴𝗲 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝗲𝗿 𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗲𝘀. 𝗠𝘆 𝗲𝘆𝗲𝘀 𝗰𝗹𝗼𝘀𝗲𝗱. 𝗜 𝘀𝗽𝘂𝗻 𝗮𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝗹𝗶𝗸𝗲 𝗮 𝘄𝗵𝗶𝗿𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗱𝗲𝗿𝘃𝗶𝘀𝗵 𝗳𝗲𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗮 𝗹𝗼𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴, 𝗻𝗼𝗻-𝗯𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗿𝘆 𝗔𝗹𝗹𝗮𝗵 𝘀𝗼𝗼𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗺𝘆 𝘄𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱𝘀. 𝗜 𝗳𝗲𝗹𝘁 𝗮𝘀 𝗶𝗳 𝗜 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗶𝗻𝘀𝗶𝗱𝗲 𝗺𝘆 𝘁𝗲𝗲𝗻𝗮𝗴𝗲 𝗮𝗾𝘂𝗮𝗿𝗶𝘂𝗺, 𝘀𝘄𝗶𝗺𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗶𝗻 𝗮 𝗺𝗮𝗴𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗹 𝗽𝗼𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗯𝗹𝗲𝗻𝗱𝗲𝗱 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗳𝗿𝗮𝗴𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝘁𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝗺𝘆 𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗶𝘁𝘆. 𝗟𝗶𝗸𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗾𝘂𝗮𝗻𝘁𝘂𝗺 𝘀𝘂𝗯𝗮𝘁𝗼𝗺𝗶𝗰 𝗽𝗮𝗿𝘁𝗶𝗰𝗹𝗲𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗺𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝘂𝗽 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗨𝗻𝗶𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗲, 𝗜 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗳𝗶𝗻𝗮𝗹𝗹𝘆 𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝗶𝗻𝗵𝗮𝗯𝗶𝘁 𝗮𝗹𝗹 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗱𝗶𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗿𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗳𝗮𝗰𝗲𝘁𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝘄𝗵𝗼 𝗜 𝗮𝗺 𝗶𝗻 𝗮 𝘀𝗶𝗻𝗴𝗹𝗲 𝗺𝗼𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁.
-
I'd recommend Life As A Unicorn to anyone who likes biographies, and anyone who wants to hear more about the LGBTQIA+ experience. This is a must read for Pride month (and all year round), and Al-Kadhi's intelligence, passion and empathy shine through their story.
I also felt it worked particularly well in audiobook format, especially as Al-Kadhi narrates it.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

difficulties growing up a gay muslim

Well I grew up a in a white, straight Christian family in the 1950s and 60s.
I identify wit Amrou in so many ways. I stopped believing in God but unlike him I am still a total atheist. Like him, I was going to be the person I wanted to be, not conform to the white heterosexual norm. My family had to change if they wanted me in my life, many did eventually accept me for who I am. But there are still those who don't get it. Well it's their problem not mine.
Thankfully the world has changed and homophobia is against the law. I have been in a gay relationship for 38 years and we have helped to change society's view to help the next generations of LGBTQ+. Well done Amrou for coming through it.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

🤯🤯😍😍😍

Pfuuu, where to start. Amrou is going to take you on a wonderful journey. This book should be read in schools. This is also one of many books that any parent should read. In case whether you are Muslim or not is irrelevant. Christianity has deeply rootes homophobic thoughts as well and so does many religions as we live in a patriarchal and white supremacist society. This book is a realm of fresh air. It will open new areas in your mind where so much is possible, so much love and compassion resides in these hidden spaces. Read the book or listen to it. I particularly enjoyed listening to Amrou telling his own story

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Brilliant

Uplifting, articulate, well written and truly inspiring to anyone. Was recommended to me by a friend and I have since recommended it to others!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Beautiful story

An amazing story written by an amazing person. The insights and stories he gave about his childhood were gut wrenching but I am so glad that he told it. It touches on a perspective that I have never heard from much and has changed my perspective on so many things. Couldn’t recommend it more

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A whole new world!

Being queer by itself is hard enough. Coming from an orthodox religious background suffering racism on top of that is much harder. Glamrou breaks down the foundations of how their insecurities formed n how they overcame it with time rebuilding their relationship with their family and their faith through a total roller coaster of a life...