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Training for the New Alpinism

A Manual for the Climber as Athlete
Narrated by: Roger Wayne
Length: 13 hrs and 17 mins
4.9 out of 5 stars (11 ratings)

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Summary

In Training for the New Alpinism, Steve House, world-class climber and Patagonia ambassador, and Scott Johnston, coach of US national champions and World Cup Nordic skiers, translate training theory into practice to allow you to coach yourself to any mountaineering goal. Applying training practices from other endurance sports, House and Johnston demonstrate that following a carefully designed regimen is as effective for alpinism as it is for any other endurance sport and leads to better performance. They deliver detailed instruction on how to plan and execute training tailored to your individual circumstances. 

Whether you work as a banker or a mountain guide, live in the city or the country, are an ice climber, a mountaineer heading to Denali, or a veteran of 8,000-meter peaks, your understanding of how to achieve your goals grows exponentially as you work with this audiobook. Chapters cover endurance and strength-training theory and methodology, application, and planning, nutrition, altitude, mental fitness, and assessing your goals and your strengths. 

Chapters are augmented with inspiring essays by world-renowned climbers, including Ueli Steck, Mark Twight, Peter Habeler, Voytek Kurtyka, and Will Gadd. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2014 Patagonia Books (P)2019 Tantor

What listeners say about Training for the New Alpinism

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Good book but the narration is generally poor

Good book but the narration is generally poor with multiple errors in name, place name and terminology pronunciations with a few glaring examples. Quite off putting.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Harri
  • 18-04-19

Superb

I'm impressed. This book is hugely informative but yet managed to keep me entertained. The subjective view of the author about alpinism is very interesting. I also enjoyed how the book is full of excerpts and real life stories about other legendary alpinists and climbers. It has had a impact on my own life and future climbing ambitions. For any climber I would recommend it full heartedly. As a non native English speaker I also liked the narration.

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  • Safjoe
  • 25-02-20

A manual for life

How detailed. I've a long history with physical training so I understood the narrative well. This manual is incredibly detailed and very well laid out. If you are new to physical training, expect to read the book a few times to solidify the knowledge. There is a lot of technical detail related to human physiology and you need to understand the concepts in detail to be able to manipulate your physiology into action. This is not just a book for climbers, anyone interested in self-development cN benefit from the knowledge shared herein. Now to read it again.

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  • joe
  • 14-11-19

good message, poor delivery

the narator did okay, but it obviously completely ignorant of climbing vernacular. It was hard to listen to, at times.