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The View from Flyover Country

Dispatches from the Forgotten America
Narrated by: Sarah Kendzior
Length: 6 hrs
Categories: Non-fiction, Politics
5 out of 5 stars (5 ratings)

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Summary

"A collection of sharp-edged, humanistic pieces about the American heartland.... Passionate pieces that repeatedly assail the inability of many to empathize and to humanize." (Kirkus)

A groundbreaking audiobook from the St. Louis-based journalist often credited with first predicting Donald Trump’s presidential victory.

In 2015, Sarah Kendzior collected the essays she reported for Al Jazeera and published them as The View from Flyover Country, which became a best seller and garnered praise from readers around the world. Now, The View from Flyover Country is being released with an updated introduction and epilogue that reflect on the ways that the Trump presidency was the certain result of the realities first captured in Kendzior’s essays.

A clear-eyed account of the realities of life in America’s overlooked heartland, The View from Flyover Country is a piercing critique of the labor exploitation, race relations, gentrification, media bias, and other aspects of the post-employment economy that gave rise to a president who rules like an autocrat. The View from Flyover Country is necessary listening for anyone who believes that the only way for America to fix its problems is to first discuss them with honesty and compassion.

©2018 Sarah Kendzior (P)2018 Macmillan Audio

Critic reviews

“Please put everything aside and try to get ahold of Sarah Kendzior’s collected essays, The View from Flyover Country. I have rarely come across writing that is as urgent and beautifully expressed. What makes Kendzior’s writing so truly important is [that] it...documents where the problem lies, by somebody who lives there.” (The Wire)

“Sarah Kendzior is as harsh and tenacious a critic of the Trump administration as you’ll find. She isn’t some new kid on the political block or a controversy machine.... Rather she is a widely published journalist and anthropologist who has spent much of her life studying authoritarianism.” (Columbia Tribune)

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  • Marcus
  • 06-07-18

Stark and necessary

I came by Kendzior's work via her Twitter and have been shaken by how prescient her assessments and predictions of the current US political machinations were. Her career as an academic studying authoritarian and autocratic regimes has given her a unique perspective on what's occurring daily.

I'd wished for some time that this book be available on audio and was not disappointed. Thoughtful and eloquent, it reads almost as an autopsy on the American socioeconomic realities that led to our current condition. A must read, in my opinion.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • C. Kret
  • 02-02-19

Authors short stories on what is wrong in America

Interesting but difficult listen. A collection of short articles previously published by the author. Few solutions offered but a lot of issues exposed with in depth analysis. Rather monotone making engagement difficult. Nothing new that has not already been noted. A view from an educated Democrat in St. Louis. Sorry but would not recommend. I read it to understand the person behind the Twitter account. Made me aware of severe generational differences btw author (30's) and myself (60's). Adept at defining current issues but fails to relate why some of these issues exist (ie effect of cold war on an entire gen) or how they might be solved.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • wanda
  • 03-05-18

Repetitive

This book of essays has been marketed as potentially enlightening readers on the rise of the Trump cult. It does not. Most of the essays were written years before the Trump phenomenon, and although they give insight as to the decay contained in end stage capitalism, they offer no explanation as to why Trump did so well in fly over country. In fact the title is a misnomer because little of the book has anything to do with flyover country. If you want a good perspective on what happened to flyover country, read "Whatever happened to Kansas." Much more enlightening. Further, the essay collection could have used heavy editing. They are very repetitive and I got tired of the same point being made about unpaid internships and adjunct faculty ad nauseam. Once was enough. I'm smart enough to get it. Finally, the author reads this and the performance is dismal: lacking in passion or any affect and poorly articulated. She drops her letter "t" repeatedly. Forgotten becomes "forgo-en", Clinton becomes "Clin-en". Very annoying. I don't recommend this book.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

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  • Heather
  • 22-04-19

Would not recommend

As others have noted - the title does not match the contents. Other than being located in "Flyover Country," Sarah Kendzior spends little time commenting on the area. Most of the essays are fixated on the coasts. No solutions are offered, and by the middle of the collection, you have heard all of her main points, which then get regurgitated over and over. I was also disappointed by the general lack of substantive fact to back up her point. And lastly, the narration is one of the worst I've heard. So monotone, and almost as if she had a lack of interest in what she was reading. I do not recommend.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • DES-RIO
  • 04-10-18

get this book<br />

I am giving this book to everyone I love. well expressed and easy to understand.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Kathleen Diermier
  • 30-04-18

Searing

The cataracts fall from our eyes. Sarah’s description of our country’s economic landscape is so vivid one can’t help but see where we have arrived and who we have become

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Barb Valaw
  • 16-06-18

Good points outweighed by outdated essays and poor

Most of this book is outdated. Narrator speaks in a singsong monotone. Waste of time.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Cindy
  • 18-10-19

Excellent

I made my daughter read this book before she left for college so she could know about the pot holes in the road leading to success.

It’s priceless.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 18-09-19

View from flyover country

Sarah Kendzior is brilliant as always. This is a collection of essays, so be prepared for it to read as such. She will keep you thinking and provide you with new insight and knowledge

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  • E. D. Ruenes
  • 02-09-19

Pretty Good, If a Little Repetitive by the End

Thought this was generally an interesting listen. The book is a series of essays, all by the same author, so as you'd expect, they become repetitive after a while. The reader's voice started to get to me near the end, mainly because each chapter begins with a sad anecdote or fact that sounded a little too polished after hearing it chapter after chapter. That said, she's clear in the reading it it is all at a steady pace. That said, the title is a bit deceptive. I thought this would be much about the midwest or the center of the country (an are I usually just call "the middle") but it was about the broad disparity in opportunities based mostly on economics, with comparably brief detours on topics such as race and social media. My favorite chapter was on Snowden, as she places his actions into context by describing what she perceives his reasoning to be for his actions, without ignoring that what he did was treasonous.