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The Ten Types of Human

A New Understanding of Who We Are and Who We Can Be
Narrated by: Tom Clegg
Length: 26 hrs and 32 mins
4 out of 5 stars (105 ratings)

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Summary

This audiobook will introduce you to ten people. In a way, you already know them. Only you don't - not really. In a sense, they are you. Only they're not entirely. They inform and shape the most important decisions in your life. But you're almost certainly unaware of their intervention.

They are the Ten Types of Human. Who are they? What are they for? How did they get into your head? We want to believe that there are some things we would never do. We want to believe that there are others we always would. But how can we be sure? What are our limits? Do we have limits? The answer lies with the Ten Types of Human: the people we become when we are faced with life's most difficult decisions. But who or what are these types? Where do they come from? How did they get into our heads?

The Ten Types of Human is a pioneering examination of human nature. It looks at the best and worst that human beings are capable of and asks why. It explores the frontiers of the human experience, excavating the forces that shape our thoughts and actions in extreme situations. It begins in a courtroom and journeys across four continents and through the lives of some exceptional people, in search of answers.

Mixing cutting-edge neuroscience, social psychology and human rights research, The Ten Types of Human is at once a provocation and a map to our hidden selves. It provides a new understanding of who we are - and who we can be.

©2017 Dexter Dias (P)2017 Random House Audiobooks

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This book blew me away

What made the experience of listening to The Ten Types of Human the most enjoyable?

Oh wow! This book is a mind changer. I cannot recommend it highly enough. Dexter Dias is a very gifted writer and his subject matter is challenging and deeply affecting at the same time. I am glad I chose the audio version because I could keep listening when reading would have been difficult. This is one of the few books I will listen to again.

Any additional comments?

I wish the author had narrated this himself. I just feel it would have had an even greater impact that way (if that is possible).

5 people found this helpful

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Barrister discovers empathy

I bought this hoping for some new insights into the workings of humans. From all the detailed references he provides to other studies it at first appeared promising. It is however just a very long winded look at the examples of empathy which he renames. His voyage of 'discovery' takes him around the world to view the worst crimes and circumstances which occur on the planet. Disease, rape, torture, slavery you name it, it is here. The big discovery is that some of us do something about these because of empathy rather than purely selfish reasons. This is not news to anyone who knows basic psychology, although it is presented as such.

15 people found this helpful

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Depressing

Morbid and dreary. Listened for hours before I finally gave in. I’m all for reality and but this was plain depressing.

1 person found this helpful

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Psychology light

For such a long book- and yes I did finish it there’s surprisingly little psychology
This book seems to be many stories- most slightly traumatic and sad that the author has gathered the through his legal career
Some fit nicely some seem to be slightly shoe- horned in
The annoying thing about this as an audiobook is the style and the recording
As spoken work when the author decides to change topic suddenly from an unfortunate lady who had a massive stroke to a researcher studying a tropical fish I just got left frustrated- please stick to one subject and I found it irritating like someone with flight of ideas who can’t keep their train of thought
The recording is also surprisingly patchy with several mispronounced medical words, many odd volume changes and too short spaces like something’s been added
The psychology when it gets there is mildly interesting but not massively insightful

1 person found this helpful

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Repetitive structure and a show off.

Poorly structured, repetitive and a show off. The sustained excitement of the emphatic narration did not hide that not every sentence was a revelation. Dias is doing some fine work but the repetition and self promotion doubled the length it needed to be.

1 person found this helpful

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A long but very rewarding read

Excellent book for anybody who has worked in international aid or human rights. Well written and wonderful naration.

1 person found this helpful

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What is this going on about?

I haven't got a clue what I'm listening to, seriously. Choppy and changing. I cannot grasp the central stories for the side tracks. Don't get any sense of lucidity that other reviewers gave me promise of. I may be the only person that thinks this way but simply have to put it out there. I am familiar with Sapiens et al, so thought this would fit nicely. I didn't pick up a graspable premise or promise or method of what is to come. So although I haven't given up, will attempt to listen to the end, I haven't got a clue what is going on. There is something wrong with the narration, because although a good reader the tone of voice is not even, so I can't easily hear the whole sentence - some words just drop off.

1 person found this helpful

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Wonderful book and great narrative

Two of the best books I have read this year have been written by human rights lawyers (the other being "East West Street"). I kept seeing this book at the 2017 Hay-on-Wye festival but didn't see his talk sadly as I think this book is a masterpiece blending true, riveting stories that cover topics as diverse as slavery, rescuing people from hopeless situations, assisted suicide, FGM (female genitalia mutilation), horrific revenge, the power of a parents love and others. The stories are gripping and Dias can paint a wonderful picture wether in a cold, empty bar in Russia, talking to a wonderful lady who communicates one letter at a time with her eye or the effects of people living different lives in places as far as Africa or USA or Asia. Much as this stories can grip (and they do), he uses these to tell us about who we are, what we are and why do we sometimes behave in an often myriad, different ways. I hope as many people read this wonderful book mixing wonderful narratives with neuroscience and other scientific research, philosophy, and moral dilemmas and questions. I loved this book and it has made me want to contribute to changing the world to a better place. Let's build bridges rather than walls. It's not a quick read but the author brings everything together at the end, as if listening to the vibrations of a symphony with all the pieces coming together. Brilliant! I only wonder why is wasn't reviewed in many papers but feel lucky I stumbled upon it. A few weeks have passed since reading but I can't forget it.

1 person found this helpful

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Read by a robot

Absolutely dreadful!! The person reading this has no intonation and cannot read a comprehensible sentence. Impossible to follow . Content repetitive anyway. Do not buy

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powerful, durable, beautiful and at times god damn heartbreaking

That the narrative jumps about in exploring and articulating evidence is entirely the point and the beauty of this book. The core subject is complex, disconnected, heterogeneous, yet somehow the author weaves this mass of all possible portraitures into archetypes that are relatable, recognizable, vital and, above all else, enduringly real. It’s just so satisfying as a listener to hear something so personal, so learned and well researched being put into the world as a reflection of who and what humanity is, with the sincerest of hopes of what it might be. On a very personal note, I listened to this on the way to work one morning and there was a story that hooked me so severely that some observant person asked me if I was ok. What I wish to have said in that moment was that if people listen to this book and embrace even 10% of its ideas, I probably will be.

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  • GB
  • 05-04-18

Not for Socialists

I was interested in this book all the way through. It is full of interesting anecdotes and social science. There was a sense of unease about it that took awhile to gel. It reminds me of nothing so such as those tales of Victorian Adventurers like David Livingstone, Richard Burton and Lawrence of Arabia telling of their exploits in the Empire.

This is definitely the world of the benighted judged through a sort of reversed telescope of
entitled privilege and name dropping. And the author tell us he is very fond of judging very often .

This doesn't mean that it is bad or uninteresting or even flawed but it is definitely the world seen from a very coddled self confident distance. The overall effect is a long sermon by a High Anglican Oxbridge parson in the Royal Geographical Society or an Inn dinner.