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The Sacred History

How Angels, Mystics and Higher Intelligence Made Our World
Narrated by: David Bauckham
Length: 14 hrs and 21 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (52 ratings)

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Summary

The Sacred History is an account of the workings of the supernatural in history. It tells the epic story of angels, from Creation to Evolution and through to the operations of the supernatural in the modern world. This tale of how people and peoples have been helped by angels and other angelic beings is woven into a spellbinding narrative that brings together Krishna, Moses, Buddha, Elijah, Mary and Jesus, Mohammed, Joan of Arc, the angels who helped Hungarian Jews persecuted by the Nazis, and stories from African, Native American, and Celtic traditions.

Told from the spiritual point of view, The Sacred History relates every betrayal, every change of heart, every twist and turn, everything that looks like a coincidence, every portent, every clue, every defeat, every rescue moments before the prison door clangs shut. This is the angelic version of events.

©2013 Jonathan Black (P)2013 WF Howes Ltd

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Too important to miss

If you could sum up The Sacred History in three words, what would they be?

One of the most entertaining and important books ever written. Our history, our ancient myths and fairytales, our future; nothing is what it appears on the surface. Common threads of esoteric mysticism run through all cultures and all history and point towards a future rarely imagined. A labour of love and a work of genius.

6 people found this helpful

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Jump.

The point that spoilt this book for me was the jumping from place to a totally different place. The only thing that kept me listening. There were some good points and supervision which kept me listening. Would I recommend this title, yes but with reservations..

2 people found this helpful

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awesome

own both books and audio books by Jonathan black . put together the story and history of human consciousness beautifully. could listen to both books over and over a great listen or read for anyone fascinated by philosophy and religion. beautifully done with clever writing to make you question and look at things from a different perspective

1 person found this helpful

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Great book

Very well presented informative book. A lot of cross over that fill in gaps to some common knowledge along with less common knowledge. A very worth while read to anyone interested in esoteric subjects.

1 person found this helpful

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Another very interesting book by Jonathon Black

What made the experience of listening to The Sacred History the most enjoyable?

After listening to secret history of the world, I knew this book was going to leave me that little bit more enlightened.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Sacred History?

A lot of this book was a broadening of the stories and understanding of the stories mentioned in the secret history of the world. this made it an interesting listen.

What three words best describe David Bauckham’s performance?

tempo "ok" understanding "ok" pronunciation of some key words "terrible"

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I listen while driving to and from work and this book suited that purpose beautifully

Any additional comments?

The pronunciation of some key words made me and get a little annoyed and cringe at times it made me wonder why this was not checked before the book went out its probably not David Bauckhams fault but still very annoying

3 people found this helpful

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Sacred or Profane?

I don’t think I have ever encountered the word ‘later’ more anywhere than within this title. If you subscribe to idealism, mysticism and spiritualism you will likely enjoy this book. If you are otherwise inclined, then you might find the book challenging though not necessarily in the manner that the author would claim. In my opinion he does not sufficiently caveat his work from the outset, instead leaving its disclosure until much, much "later". It is therefore difficult not to recoil at some of the stories and messages within. You might wish to save yourself a credit and enjoy something with a little more objectivity and substance. it certainly isn't as radical or out there as it would claim. Black mentioned during this book that people are drawn to the subscription of the mystical. His work is not atavistic, he demonstrates the persistence of miracles in everyday life from the ancient to the contemporary. Black’s work continues in humankinds’ quest for understanding and to cement the position of the mystical within this quest. As a philosopher he certainly pursues its core reason d’etre to challenge existing dogma. In this sense it is truly thought provoking and evocative. Spinoza argued that miracles are lawlike events whose causes we are ignorant of. Ignorant in the realms of idealism and materialism. Einstein once said that “Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.” These do not sound like the words of a simply material outlook on the world. Science is objective and whilst it might be quantifiable it will yield subjective facts and is therefore necessary. Without these ‘truths’ anyone could claim to have witnessed a miracle for their own betterment and to subjugate others. Idealism and materialism are both flawed, idealists can be described as lost and deluded, as arrogant as this may sound, materialists have lost perspective on subjectivity and teachings focusing on human thought and experience. To this end this book focuses solely on the mystical and does little to argue a case for it to be considered seriously in the pursuit of knowledge. A more comprehensive (though admittedly incomplete) overview would be to conclude that: The Sacred History is Socratic focusing on the good, and in so doing completely eschews the bad or evil that becomes of miracles. Anti-miracles could be described as plagues or famines and can even be committed through the acts of people. Black uses historic figures crudely to illicit his case and to espouse mystic teachings and influence such as Napoleon, Joan of Arc and even briefly mentions Adolf Hitler. He speaks of the magnetism of characters such as these and defines the miraculous visions of Joan or Arc as prophetic in defiance of the ‘British’ (if he had been more diligent, he would have written English and French). Perhaps it would have ‘too radical’ for him to develop his citation of the actions of Hitler as prophetic in his treatment of the annihilation of millions in concentration camps? This would be consistent with how others such as Joan are portrayed and the logic he presents throughout the text. Miracles are products of our perceptions but also of our ignorance. Ignorance and fear created the Gods and the dangerous and ambitious have twisted these tenets to validate their actions however cruel. Black denigrates science and or materialism throughout the book which one can view with suspicion. The discourse does little to nothing to argue an objective case against Idealism or his philosophy that Angels deserve more consideration throughout world history. This is exemplified by glossing over complex scientific theories within the narrative, mainly in the final phase of the book. Black describes scientific understanding concerning creation as “Tiny scraps of evidence.” This is perhaps oxymoronic as there is little attention to problems with miracles throughout his book. Indeed, this could be as he states to try and get the audience to consider the possibility that miracles do exist and that they are forgotten in contemporary intellectual thinking. There are too many omissions from this text for it to be taken seriously for me and to avoid such fundamental questions causes me question its validity. Some of which are conscience, and the problem of intuition. Whilst it is undeniable that Black has an entertaining way of summarising history, stories, myths and legends. He does not show enough evidence that he has a genuine appreciation of the disciplines he chooses to gloss over to illustrate his point. Black uses the adage that victors write history, which is not entirely true, there are numerous examples of this. Furthermore, the majority of chroniclers throughout the ages have been religious men, with a tendency to write prophetically. His views are certainly Socratic, and describes Socrates trial solely on the basis of his internal beliefs omitting that those who brought him to trial were advocates of democracy and not authoritarianism. The Peloponnesian War led to the subjugation of Athens to the Spartans who supplanted its leaders with the 30 Tyrants, whose rule was entwined with the beliefs of the philosopher. There are many more oversights of this nature within this title. Let us not assume that Black or anyone could hope to ensconce their theories in contemporary society and his views are just as valid as anyone else’s. Perhaps modern miracles should be more considered in intellectual debate and I do not deny that his theories might be true. The development of science is to develop our understanding of the laws of nature. Mathematics was once considered not to have a place in scientific thought and now could be considered as the core language of this discipline. Such exponents of science cannot all be taxonomically placed into the materialist categorisation. Indeed, students of dualism and metaphysics would argue the contrary that science and religion both have a place together. Mathematicians and scientists do argue for the case of the unknown, instead of citing quantum mechanics, Black could have focused more on Particle Physics, Super Symmetry, String Theory and developed his musings concerning the CERN project. With the benefit of hindsight to this work, the scientists and engineers at CERN have contributed towards the finding of the Higgs-Boson or ‘God Particle’. This “Dry intellectual activity”, has drastically enhanced our knowledge and understanding of the creation of all things. I think there are a few thousand such people who would ardently challenge his observation that we know little to nothing about the origins of the universe. I would also wager that many of these would be of a religious persuasion and may even believe in miracles themselves. This work is potentially dangerous as miracles cannot entirely be conceived as good or favourable events and that materialism has a core duty to defend humanity with logic and evidence to protect us from the machinations of evil people.

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Very topicical

Very interesting listen. Deep, very meaningful and very topical, especially at this current time.

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An essential insight

The Sacred History is in many ways remarkably similar to The Secret History, however it stands as a deeper exploration of the supernatural approaches first explored in The Secret History. The Sacred History covers the same cosmological approach to The Secret History, whereas the Secret History concerns man's interactions with the Supernatural and the cosmic mind through the secret societies, The Sacred History concerns the actual disembodied beings themselves and numerous human interactions with them. Despite the similarities with his other work, The Sacred History is every bit a compelling read. For those who are tired with the Materialist Reductionist Paradigm and are looking for more compelling accounts for looking beyond the approach of "what you see is all there is" then this is an excellent way to open one's mind to higher possibilities and ever greater wonder. And one may ask, why not? We have at many points in life felt the wonder, experienced how there is much more to reality than atoms, but the ubiquitous nature of the Materialist Reductionist Paradigm, and the accompanying academic prejudices have caused us to silence the inner voice. For anyone who listens to the inner voice, or would like to hear the inner voice more, this book is an essential listen. Additionally, David Bauckham's narration is decent and appropriate.

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Absolutely awesome.

I'm only half way through so far and I have learnt more about different deities and gods than I have ever learnt in my life. How they're all intertwined and so on. It's very well put together amd David has a great voice too, it's nice to find someone who I can listen to without getting bored. I can't compliment this audio book enough, just give it a go!

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Glaring Omissions

For a man apparently so knowledgeable about the history of all things incorporeal, the author is strikingly uncritical of the historical anecdotes that he presents as fact. Every story is taken at face value. A being appears to an individual - it must be an angel, and every word it speaks is God's truth! Surely our spiritual cousins should be subjected to the same rigourous analysis of motivation etc. as their flesh-and-blood counterparts? And who, indeed, is this being claiming to be God? In a field now so ripe with excellent material from enquiring minds, this book with its unquestioning, unexplorative portrayal of standard religious history comes across as either spectactulary naive - or, possibly, as the tool of a disinformation agenda.

1 person found this helpful