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The New Silk Roads

The Present and Future of the World
Narrated by: Leighton Pugh
Length: 6 hrs and 44 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (149 ratings)
Regular price: £14.99
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Summary

All roads used to lead to Rome. Today, they lead to Beijing.'

When The Silk Roads was published in 2015, it became an instant classic. A major reassessment of world history, it compelled us to look at the past from a different perspective. The New Silk Roads brings this story up to date, addressing the present and future of a world that is changing dramatically.

Following the Silk Roads eastwards, from Europe through to China, by way of Russia and the Middle East, The New Silk Roads provides a timely reminder that we live in a world that is profoundly interconnected. In an age of Brexit and Trump, the themes of isolation and fragmentation permeating the Western world stand in sharp contrast to events along the Silk Roads since 2015, where ties have been strengthened and mutual cooperation established.

With brilliant insight, Peter Frankopan takes a fresh look at the network of relationships being formed along the length and breadth of the Silk Roads today, assessing the global reverberations of these continual shifts in the centre of power - all too often absent from headlines in the West. This important - and ultimately hopeful - book asks us to reassess who we are and where we are in the world, illuminating the themes on which all our lives and livelihood depend.

©2018 Peter Frankopan (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

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Dull

The first Silk Roads had me constantly coming back for more, including listening to it twice. it was a fantastic book which dealt with a complex topic in an eloquent way.

The follow up read more like a weak attempt to follow up on the former books success. This is something it fails to do by reading like a mere list of current world events.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

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I learned a lot

Fascinating subject matter, well explained for the average reader, helped me to put a context around apparently unconnected events in world politics. Also the narrator, Leighton Pugh, has such an easy voice to listen to and an engaging style.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Poor historical context

i was shocked the author chose to regurgitate standard narratives unchallenged. for instance when the Crimea story is hauled out as an example of how scared we should all be of Russia as if Russian actions re Crimea just came out of nowhere, land-grabbing a chunk of Uruguay or sometjing. Pretending "the day before" unexists is a trick that one should always be suspicioua of, i wouldnt have expected that from an historian. As a result the book came over as basically a selection of Western talking points that are currently fashionable at the moment, you'd be better off just reading The Economist or something. Not enlightening.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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The world in balance

Many news papers or documentaries give us an extremely narrow minded view of the rest of the world: mainly bad and dangerous. This is a brilliant account of a better helicopter view. Great!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Fascinating. I learned something in every chapter

I loved this audiobook as it revealed things to me that I didn't know before. I learned something in every chapter. This was one of my books of the year 2018.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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A particularly well written Guardian editorial

The book is simply too caught up in the then current events of a few months ago and seems very dated already due to the fast paced and ever changing nature of Trump's presidency. Frankopan is ultimately a better historian than he is a journalist with the book constantly stumbling into well worn arguments against Trump and Brexit that are by now very boring.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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The balance of power goes from west to east

An update to Frankopan's bestselling and widely acclaimed The Silk Roads. Having covered world history in his previous book, he now looks at the present. The focus is overwhelmingly on economics, trade and political developments. Our news media should certainly pay more attention to what's happening in Central Asia, China and Southeast Asia. The interconnections of the world means that what happens in one part can great affect another. The future of the west will be deeply intertwined with what happens in China. When there is talk of a conflict between the US and China, it is worrying as financial markets and trade are deeply dependent on China.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • m
  • 15-12-18

what's really going on geopolitically?<br />

The present explained and future direction of travel of the world. The American Empire is over and the balance of economic and military power has shifted eastwards. Historically this was always the case. Indian and Chinese economies expanded for 1600 of the past 2100 years except for a brief interlude represented by colonial expectation. The sequel of The Empire Strikes Back is well underway and the astronomical investment in infrastructure and industry throughout the vast expanse between Turkey and China will represent the dawning of a new and competitive age. Bring it on!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • HellRazor
  • In Transit. An eclectic gourmand rather than a picky gourmet.
  • 24-11-18

The Sun Sets In The West and Rises (once again) In The East.

Frankopan is a solid writer, he writes clearly but sheds light on nothing new here.

The author has a defining point of view and he is no Americanophile.

China wins as the US curls up like a man in a street fight as the rest of the world kicks it.

End of.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Is irrelevance the fate of the West?

The author sets out to address this question and has produced an interesting analysis of the factors at work.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful