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Summary

The dazzling new novel from Michelle de Kretser, author of Questions of Travel, best seller and winner of the Miles Franklin Award. 

Set in Sydney, Paris and Sri Lanka, The Life to Come is a mesmerising novel about the stories we tell and don't tell ourselves as individuals, as societies and as nations. It feels at once firmly classic and exhilaratingly contemporary. 

Pippa is a writer who longs for success. Celeste tries to convince herself that her feelings for her married lover are reciprocated. Ash makes strategic use of his childhood in Sri Lanka but blots out the memory of a tragedy from that time.

Driven by riveting stories and unforgettable characters, here is a dazzling meditation on intimacy, loneliness and our flawed perception of other people. 

Profoundly moving as well as wickedly funny, The Life to Come reveals how the shadows cast by both the past and the future can transform, distort and undo the present. This extraordinary novel by Miles Franklin-winning author Michelle de Kretser will strike your soul.

©2017 Michelle de Kretser (P)2018 Bolinda Publishing Pty Ltd

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  • 18-05-18

Sadly, these tales do not ignite interest

Small portions of lyrical description build an expectation and then nothing happens.
How disappointing.
Courageous criticism of Australian foibles or academic pretensions, the list of subjects of these criticisms are lengthy, rise up promisingly, then fade and only appear to be snide comments.
And the voice actor - who produced this? The pronunciations were so poor as to make a listener flinch with embarrassment. The whole cadence of sentences were lost.