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The Last Manchu

The Autobiography of Henry Pu Yi, Last Emperor of China
Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
Length: 11 hrs and 18 mins
4 out of 5 stars (13 ratings)

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Editor reviews

This autobiography of Henry Pu Yi, the last Qing emperor, tells the real-life story of a king in pauper's clothing. A head of state by the time he learned to walk, Pu Yi's shifting fortunes found him deposed, reinstated, jailed for war crimes, and ultimately redeemed, oddly enough, in the eyes of the communist government, while he lived and worked as a commoner. With a voice reminiscent of the great Alec Guinness, Gildart Jackson delivers audiences a tremulous performance, capturing the conflicted nature of the beleaguered emperor. The English actor exudes a regal sophistication, alternately punctured by arrogance and regret as Pu Yi grapples with unlikely turns of fate.

Critic reviews

"Important and fascinating." ( The New York Times)

What members say

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Really Good

Story told by its protagonist in a personal, non objective and powerful way. A great discover in world history.

2 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Interesting perspective on Chinese 20th C history.

I enjoyed listening to this. The narration is good and pleasant to hear. It's an interesting biography, particularly his experiences of being outside the people's revolution, so I would recommend.

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Pronunciation

What didn’t you like about Gildart Jackson’s performance?

This man can not pronounce Chinese names. It was an irritant from the beginning that he did not pronounce Cixi's name as 'Tzerchi' he kept calling her 'Sooshe'. It was the same with other Chinese names. This is most disrespectful and very annoying. He also read in a somewhat robotic manner, some expression would have been appreciated.

1 person found this helpful

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Sorry to be harsh

Didnt get far with this book. I expect, that in keeping with its reputation its a fascinating and beautiful book. The reader has a pleasant and expressive voice, but hesitates in his phrasing sometimes so words come out a bit like computer generated speech. Unfortunately, I quickly found I was just listening to his pronunciation instead of the book proper.

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  • Sparkly
  • 08-08-13

A Marvelous and Ultimately Sad Memoir

This relatively short but detailed memoir covers the epic events of the last hundred years, told by Henry Pu Yi, the last appointed emperor of the Q'ing Dynasty. Pu Yi clearly underwent enough psychological trauma for several lifetimes - complete lack of childhood boundaries; virtual imprisonment after the birth of the Republic of China; collaboration and betrayal with the Japanese in Manchukuo; incarceration by the Soviet Union; ideological re-education by Communist authorities. I found his perspective to be startling. How can a person be simultaneously so pitiable and yet insufferable? Both helpless and haughty? Fascinating. Much of the emotional impact of the memoir comes from the fact that we readers know that he was being taken advantage of by many sides - yet Pu Yi seems tragically oblivious. I surmise that this memoir emerges from the massive "confessions" generated in the re-education camp - it definitely has mea culpa overtones.

It is a useful companion to the Bertolucci film, incidentally, which seems to follow this memoir fairly closely (with a few extra characters here and there for drama). The narrator does a remarkable job of interpreting Pu Yi's persona (cool, and with little affect) and does pretty well on the Chinese pronunciations. Bravo!

3 people found this helpful

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  • Alemap
  • 14-02-17

The Last Manchu

If you're a fan of history--and Chinese history particularly--then this book is for you. Well done and excellently performed, I enjoyed it immensely.

2 people found this helpful

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  • yoanna
  • 26-04-19

A case of bad narration ruining a great story

The story is truly fascinating. Like most Westerners, prior to this book, I only knew about the life story of China's last emperor from Bertolucci's 1987 movie. After I started listening to this, I also looked him up on the (sign, where else) good old wikipedia. This autobiography glossed over, albeit understandably, A WHOLE LOT of things, including the total omission of such unimportant fact as the murder of the newborn child of the empress). And of course, one can't help noticing all that propaganda. Despite all the above-mentioned issues, it is fascinating to hear such fascinating life story from his own perspective...But seriously, couldn’t the narrator at least make a tiny little more effort in pronouncing any the Chinese names correctly?

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  • Celeste Phelps
  • 25-09-18

Wow! What a great book!

As an avid fan of Chinese history, Pu yi's journey was incredible! I admire how he was able to get through what he did and was finally able to get what he wanted: to be a free man in so many ways.