Listen free for 30 days

  • The Hitler Conspiracies

  • The Third Reich and the Paranoid Imagination
  • By: Richard J. Evans
  • Narrated by: Leighton Pugh
  • Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History, Europe
  • 4.2 out of 5 stars (36 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

Brought to you by Penguin. 

The renowned historian of the Third Reich takes on the conspiracy theories surrounding Adolf Hitler and the Nazis, in a vital history book for the 'post-truth' age.

The idea that nothing happens by chance in history, that nothing is quite what it seems to be at first sight, that everything is the result of the secret machinations of malign groups of people manipulating everything from behind the scenes - these notions are as old as history itself. But conspiracy theories are becoming more popular and more widespread in the 21st century. Nowhere have they become more obvious than in revisionist accounts of the history of the Third Reich. Long-discredited conspiracy theories have taken on a new lease of life, given credence by claims of freshly discovered evidence and novel angles of investigation.

In The Hitler Conspiracies renowned historian Richard Evans takes five widely discussed claims involving Hitler and the Nazis and subjects them to forensic scrutiny: that the Jews were conspiring to undermine civilisation, as outlined in The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, that the German army was 'stabbed in the back' by socialists and Jews in 1918, that the Nazis burned down the Reichstag in order to seize power, that Rudolf Hess' flight to the UK in 1941 was sanctioned by Hitler and conveyed peace terms suppressed by Churchill and that Hitler escaped the bunker in 1945 and fled to South America. In doing so, it teases out some surprising features that these, and other conspiracy theories, have in common.

This is a history book, but it is a history book for the age of 'post-truth' and 'alternative facts': a book for our own troubled times.

©2020 Richard J. Evans (P)2020 Penguin Audio

What listeners say about The Hitler Conspiracies

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    20
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    3
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    23
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    17
  • 4 Stars
    10
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Usual Bourgeois Hysteria.

As soon as I heard the Author incorrectly state that Stalin fought his way to the top (when in fact he was continuously elected by popular vote into power) and that Hitler did not believe in conspiracy theories (read Mein Kampf for Hitler's detailed explanation of the anti-semitic conspiracy theory he believed in) - I knew this Author did not know what he was talking about! The NKVD (not Stalin) exposed numerous Western plots in the USSR and crushed them - whilst Hitler believed in the Occult and opposed race-mixing on the grounds it was a 'conspiracy' to weaken the German race! This is like the false 'conspiracy' the US is currently propagating about China regarding the anti-intellectual assertion of 'Concentration Camps' in Xinjiang! The utter stupidity of this Author reminds me of a QAnon conspiracist attempting to persuade the rest of us he is harmless and that only he possesses a superior insight the rest of us is lacking!

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Interesting book, very informative on Fake History

Excellent deconstruction of Nazi-related conspiracy theories. Should move onto JFK, Pearl Harbor, 9/11, Moon landings etc.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

So-so

Well it was ok. I dont believe the conspiracy theories the author was debunking, most of them anyway. But he went on and on and covered relatively little. And towards the end it got very dull.

1 person found this helpful