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Summary

The number one English-language best seller in China - the book that is shaping China's planning and policy for the future.

A "gray rhino" is a highly probable, high impact yet neglected threat: kin to both the elephant in the room and the improbable and unforeseeable black swan. Gray rhinos are not random surprises, but occur after a series of warnings and visible evidence. The bursting of the housing bubble in 2008, the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and other natural disasters, the new digital technologies that upended the media world, the fall of the Soviet Union...all were evident well in advance. 

Why do leaders and decision makers keep failing to address obvious dangers before they spiral out of control? Drawing on her extensive background in policy formation and crisis management, as well as in-depth interviews with leaders from around the world, Michele Wucker shows in The Gray Rhino how to recognize and strategically counter looming high impact threats. Filled with persuasive stories, real-world examples, and practical advice, The Gray Rhino is essential listening for managers, investors, planners, policy makers, and anyone who wants to understand how to profit by avoiding getting trampled. 

This audiobook features an introduction read by the author. 

©2016 Michele Wucker (P)2016 Macmillan Audio

What listeners say about The Gray Rhino

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  • Anonymous
  • 07-04-18

Really bad narration

The first chapter is read by the author and sounds great, then the book switches to a narrator who doesn’t have any grasp of the material.

2 people found this helpful

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  • El Fadil
  • 13-10-17

The voice is not for an audiobook

The voice is not for an audiobook. The book is interesting and frankly I had a challenge following the voice because simply its monoton to follow it

4 people found this helpful

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  • Richard Redano
  • 24-05-21

Displays Ignorance of Central Asian Geography

The book provides an insightful framework for analyzing Gray Rhinos. In Chapter 5 of the Audible version at 26:38 to 26:44, the author states that Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Kazakhstan are “central European” countries. This shows an astounding ignorance of central Asian geography.
The author’s numerous references to “clean energy” indicate a lack of awareness of the environmental impact of (a) rare earth mineral mining, (b) using metallurgical coal to make steel and concrete for wind turbines, and (c) disposing of solar voltaic panels after their useful life. An August 5, 2019 article in the WSJ stated that 900 tons of steel, 2500 tons of concrete and 45 tons of plastic make up one wind turbine.
In some places the book warns against adopting “group think” while praising the “wisdom of crowds” in other places. No guidance is provided on how to distinguish group think form the wisdom of crowds.

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  • chris boutte
  • 05-04-21

Incredible book on why we don't act when in danger

I've had a Generalized Anxiety Disorder most of my life, and I'm extremely fortunate that it's been under control for a while now. Although my anxiety doesn't take over my life anymore, I'm still rather risk averse. Meanwhile, I see people living these care-free lives as if nothing could ever go wrong, and it typically ends in disaster. I've always asked, "Why do people not recognize risk in a healthy way?" That's exactly why I picked up this book from Michele Wucker. I heard about it a while ago and just now read it, and It's such an amazing book. 

In the first part of the book, Wucker does a great job breaking down all of the different cognitive reasons why we don't recognize dangers. This can be at work, in life, or when it comes to global issues. She has a great chapter on denial, and I also enjoyed her chapter on why we kick the metaphorical can down the road. In the second half of the book, Wucker discusses more specific issues like climate change and also provides a lot of solutions for how we can avoid the "gray rhino" and make better decisions moving forward.

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  • Roberto Guidetti
  • 22-07-21

Relevant topic - could be more focused and concise

The author shares a relevant topic, makes helpful connections, her considerations make sense yet this could have been delivered in a much more focused and concise manner, without such deviations from the core concept and overdoing themes in the second part. With due respect to the narrator, the pace and tone really has not helped my listening in this case.