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The Far Field

A Novel
Narrated by: Sneha Mathan
Length: 14 hrs
Categories: Fiction, Literary
4 out of 5 stars (14 ratings)

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Summary

In the wake of her mother's death, Shalini, a privileged and restless young woman from Bangalore, sets out for a remote Himalayan village in the troubled northern region of Kashmir. Certain that the loss of her mother is somehow connected to the decade-old disappearance of Bashir Ahmed, a charming Kashmiri salesman who frequented her childhood home, she is determined to confront him. But upon her arrival, Shalini is brought face to face with Kashmir's politics, as well as the tangled history of the local family that takes her in. And when life in the village turns volatile and old hatreds threaten to erupt into violence, Shalini finds herself forced to make a series of choices that could hold dangerous repercussions for the very people she has come to love.

©2019 Dreamscape Media, LLC (P)2019 Dreamscape Media, LLC

Critic reviews

“Remarkable...an engrossing narrative.... Vijay’s stunning debut novel expertly intertwines the personal and political to pick apart the history of Jammu and Kashmir.” (Publishers Weekly)

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A beautiful and evocative tale

★★★★✰ 4.5 stars

The Far Field is an exceptional debut novel. Madhuri Vijay has written a quietly intense tale that both conjures and conveys feelings of uncertainty.

After her mother's death Shalini becomes detached from her daily existence. Increasingly alienated from others she makes the impulsive decision to travel to a remote Himalayan village in Kashmir where Bashir Ahmed —an old friend of her mother's— lives.
In an interview Vijay describes Shalini as being "remote and closed-off, so hamstrung by doubt and suspicion, that even [she], as the writer, occasionally felt suffocated by her voice". Well, I agree 100% with her. Shalini is a cypher. She is hesitant to demonstrate her feelings or to simply share her thoughts with the people who could potentially become her friends. Vijay has depicted her in this way quite intentionally. To me, Shalini's inability to act was yes frustrating but it also created tension. Would she finally unwind? Could she be able to really live in the present? Connect with others?

Her journey does not follow the classic 'coming of age' that often occurs in similar novels (where a character travels somewhere to 'find themselves' or to come 'to terms with their past). Shalini's experiences in Kashmir are far more realistic. An ingrained distrust still dictates a lot of what she does. I was really saddened and frustrated by her half-hearted attempt at a friendship with Zoya and Amina. Shalini seems desperate to fill in the hole left by her mother's death but she is also very reticent about revealing her innermost self.
Shalini was also utterly naive and rather self-centred. The few times she actually 'acts' or says something important she usually ends up doing or saying the wrong thing. She seems unable to read other people or to take in account what they too might be hiding/protecting their true emotions.
Given that Shalini is recounting her journey to Kashmir years after it, she often expresses the wish to have acted differently, and there are a lot of 'if onlys' which furthered the tension of her story.
Having lived a life of comfort Shalini doesn't seem to realise that not everyone knows those same comforts (which she has taken for granted).
There are chapters that focus on Shalini's childhood and on her intense relationship with her fiery mother. It is perhaps because she is so young (and sheltered) that Shalini does not notice how trapped and unhappy her seemingly strong mother was. Their strained relationship takes its toll on both mother and daughter.

This novel depicts Shalini's desperate attempts to belong and to reconcile herself with the way in which she treated (and was in turn treated by) her mother. Sadly, Shalini often acts under the wrong impression, and she either misunderstands others and or ends up being misunderstood by the ones she claims she cares for.
Vijay renders the way in which language can betray one's intention or the way in which words often are not often.
This novel has a lot to wrestle with but it does so in a paced manner. This story is one of ambivalence and dissolution; the plot rests on the novel's setting(s) and on Shalini's interactions with mainly two other families. While the author does not shy away from portraying the religious conflict occurring in Kashmir, she focuses more on the experiences of various individual characters — the way in which they themselves are affected by dispute between India and Pakistan — rather than offering a dumbed down 'overview' of Kashmir's long history of violence. Having Shalini as the narrator allows readers to glimpse Kashmir through the eyes of an 'outsider'.

This is a story about privilege, guilt, grief, and isolation. Amidst the novel's bleak realism there are some heart-rendering moments, and Vijay's writing lyrical writing often allowed me to forget of the unease created by her story. I kept hoping against hope that the ending would provide some sort of not quite magical solution but that it could at least give me some closure...but I'm afraid to say that the ending is what makes this a 4 star read rather than a 5 one. WHY?!

Anyhow, I will definitely keep my eyes open for more of Vijay's stunning and heartbreaking writing.

PS: The audiobook which was narrated by Sneha Mathan who does an incredible job. Her voice is 1)beautiful 2)capable of making me feel a wide range of emotions 3)simply captivating

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Joelle Trayers
  • 26-03-19

Expert Narration

This book is about the journey of a young woman named Shalani who deals with the grief of her mother's loss by trying to find a man she was very close to. The narrator for this tale is excellent. She expertly goes from voice to voice and made the story much more enjoyable.

54 of 56 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 07-04-19

Riveting interaction between mother and salesman

The earlier parts of the story in which the mother’s interactions with the clothing salesman and the rest of the world were described were spellbinding. The writing is excellent and the prose is wonderful and captivating. The latter part of the story wasn’t quite as interesting to me as the descriptions of the mother but still a hard to put down read. I really did like the mother and the daughter’s reaction to her ways and her actions.

53 of 55 people found this review helpful

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  • Haveenoughstuff
  • 19-01-19

Enlightening

I love novels about the colorful, bittersweet culture of India. I was particularly fascinated by the truthfulness that Westerners never hear about the tumultuous state of Kashmir. The poverty and taking of innocents by the military in Kashmir is heart wrenching. The corruption of officials is appalling. The treatment of women in India is now surfacing. It is a third world nation struggling to gain a foothold in the 21st century but cannot seem to lose its hold on its pasts’ grip on poverty vs. wealth and modern technology. Not a glossy picture, but one that opens the listeners’ eyes.

34 of 37 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Malene E. Cavin
  • 21-02-19

great surprise

I stumbled upon this book purely by chance and I must confess that I loved it. I liked how it told the story from different perspectives and enlightening the world about a (to most of the world) little known conflict was a definite bonus.

16 of 19 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Amy Lanman
  • 08-06-19

Very morose

I would not have chosen to listen to this if I had an idea of how dark and sadly miserable it was going to be. The recap by others presented a different story. I made the choice by the reader's explanations and the ranking stars. I skipped through a lot of the story because it dragged on, was depressing and the storyline was not missed as I skipped forward to save myself from the burden of listening. It was predictable at every chapter, however, I was hopeful that the end would bring something inspiring to t light to redeem my continual thought of why was I bothering to listening. Not even at the end did it have a point, an important discovery by the main character, nor an interesting plot pulled together.
A sad and misguided girl that showed her cowardly decisions at every turn of the page, to the very last words. A family that had no inspiring direction.
The only positive comment is the author knows how to write a storyline and the narrator held my interest... if you like morose stories because your life feels better for hearing such negative opposites; well at least that is something.

90 of 111 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Sandy
  • 07-10-19

What to say about this book?

I enjoyed listening to this book. I liked it but didn’t love it. I always love to hear about different cultures, so that part was great. But the ending was disappointing. Mostly, the book kept my attention but then at the end I was left thinking ... “is that it”???

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 25-09-19

A journey

This book took me through various emotions. Curiosity, adventure, love, sadness, and rage. The plot of the story takes its time to unravel, but I felt the ending was quite sudden. Still loved it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • another know it all
  • 10-09-19

beautiful

a troublesome story beautifully told. a painful lesson about multiple cultures. I also see mental illness in one character. interesting to see how it is observed when not explicitly recognized

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Terry Rusinow
  • 21-08-19

Wonderfully rich characters and story

I loved hearing this book. the characters were brought to life by the reader and I literally would listen for hours, not wanting it to end. This was no fairy tale with a happy ending, but a story of flawed humans living their lives.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Kindle Customer
  • 15-07-19

Depressing with horrible ending.

I stuck with this even though I felt no sympathy or affinity with the lead character. She was selfish and immoral, possibly due to her bipolar mother’s cruelty.

The ending was just too cruel, and she did not step up to right the terrible mistakes she made that ended in tragedy. I don’t always require a happy ending but this one left me with no hope. My only positive is that I gained a better understanding of the relations of Hindus and Muslims in India.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful