Listen free for 30 days

The Detective Wore Silk Drawers

Narrated by: David Thorpe
Series: Sergeant Cribb, Book 2
Length: 7 hrs and 1 min
5 out of 5 stars (5 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

Forbidden in Victorian England, the grim and violent world of bare-knuckle fighting has gone underground. So when a headless body is found floating in the Thames, his hands “pickled” for fighting, Sergeant Cribb knows he is facing a challenge. 

Desperate for information, they select the young constable Henry Jago to infiltrate the gang, subjecting him to a rigorous programme of purging, pickling and training. Cribb is certain that the losing fighters are being killed or worse, so getting Jago out just in time is crucial.... 

©1971 Peter Lovesey (P)2018 Soundings

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    4
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    3
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • K
  • 27-11-18

Amusing and Entertaining

Before I say anything, I think the plaudits for this audiobook largely have to go to the narrator, David Thorpe, who can elicit a snort of laughter from the most mundane of plots. His performances, characterised by their liveliness and excellent accents, are just sublime and this is no exception.

I should say that by no means is the plot of this story pedestrian so the narrator's job is made easier - it is quite a romping tale and the action and characterisation is nicely balanced. Peter Lovesey has chosen an unusual aspect of Victorian life and crime to focus on and the majority of the characters are sympathetically if rather stereotypically wrought.

There are some parts of the story that don't hang together very well: I don't really understand the significance of and therefore the inclusion of Mrs Vibart's penchant for Indian dress and home decor. Also, her sadistic streak is only obliquely explained. It seems that the writer didn't feel that being a frustrated boxing entrepreneur was enough to make her character unusual. Surely, as a woman in Victorian times, that would have been considered perverse enough without proposing that women must have a more unhinged reason for enjoying a 'masculine' sport?

These are only minor gripes, though, and I really did enjoy this story.

1 person found this helpful