Listen free for 30 days

Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Buy Now for £18.39

Buy Now for £18.39

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

Since Alexis de Tocqueville, restlessness has been accepted as a signature American trait. Our willingness to move, take risks, and adapt to change have produced a dynamic economy and a tradition of innovation from Ben Franklin to Steve Jobs.

The problem, according to legendary blogger, economist, and best-selling author Tyler Cowen, is that Americans today have broken from this tradition - we're working harder than ever to avoid change. We're moving residences less, marrying people more like ourselves, and choosing our music and our mates based on algorithms that wall us off from anything that might be too new or too different. Match.com matches us in love. Spotify and Pandora match us in music. Facebook matches us to just about everything else.

Of course, this "matching culture" brings tremendous positives: music we like, partners who make us happy, neighbors who want the same things. We're more comfortable. But, according to Cowen, there are significant collateral downsides attending this comfort, among them heightened inequality and segregation and decreased incentives to innovate and create.

The Complacent Class argues that this cannot go on forever. We are postponing change due to our nearsightedness and extreme desire for comfort, but ultimately this will make change, when it comes, harder. The forces unleashed by the Great Stagnation will eventually lead to a major fiscal and budgetary crisis: impossibly expensive rentals for our most attractive cities, worsening of residential segregation, and a decline in our work ethic. The only way to avoid this difficult future is for Americans to force themselves out of their comfortable slumber - to embrace their restless tradition again.

©2017 Tyler Cowen (P)2017 Gildan Media LLC

Critic reviews

"Tyler Cowen's blog, Marginal Revolution, is the first thing I read every morning. And his brilliant new book, The Complacent Class, has been on my nightstand after I devoured it in one sitting. I am at round-the-clock Cowen saturation right now." (Malcolm Gladwell)

What listeners say about The Complacent Class

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for RJW
  • RJW
  • 06-05-17

MUST READ


This book is a MUST READ. For a new generation flooded with hardware and software, Cowen offers important insights into a general decline in risk-taking and creativity that has been reinforced by the literal codification of existence. More and more our devices are lulling us into (advertiser-funded) augmented realities that render us into a state of numbness easily appeased by consumer goods. Cowen effectively uses social and economic examples from history and from other nations to illustrate the profound existential challenges on the rise in our device-driven realities.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Sara Ferguson
  • Sara Ferguson
  • 05-06-17

Great book. Very cerebral. Maybe better in print?

I struggled to finish sometimes due to the somewhat dry academic nature of the book. Being academic in style isn't necessarily bad, the topic was actually really well formed and argued. This is a book I definitely would have loved more in print though. I'll be buying Tyler's next book, but not in audiobook format.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for William Franklin Jr.
  • William Franklin Jr.
  • 29-11-17

First Draft Of An Actual Book

I like Tyler Cowen’s blog. I’ve read it periodically for more than a decade now. I appreciate his common sense on things, particularly economics and business and big social trends. I follow his ethnic restaurant advice (get the weirdest, worst, most inaccessible sounding thing on the menu).

This book has glimmers of interesting insights (kind of like a blog, I suppose), but it doesn’t exactly bring it home, so to speak. It just feels unfinished.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 14-07-17

great read

loved the book and the concept. highly recommended. food for thought about our society and the international geopolitical theatre

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for EVM
  • EVM
  • 03-05-17

Badly argued, selective use of data

Would you be willing to try another book from Tyler Cowen? Why or why not?

Perhaps. I expected better argumentation and tighter reasoning from him.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Dissapointment at the loose structure of the book, lack of cohesion, and general 'overfitting' of the data to support his arguments.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for William J. Sankey
  • William J. Sankey
  • 27-04-17

Confused at times

There are some intriguing insights in this book especially around NIMBY culture and urban policy but too often the author loses his point. In one chapter he seems to lament the loss of violent protest and doesn't circle back around to explain himself fully.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Andrew
  • Andrew
  • 27-04-17

An interesting read but not a scholarly treatise

Any additional comments?

This is a well-written book that musters a lot of arguments about the lack of energy and drive to succeed in the USA since the 1970's. The author could actually have written a much more upbeat book titled, "The Contented Class", with the same statistics. He could have noted that poverty has been (essentially) abolished in the USA and even poor people have much more "stuff" than middle class people did in the 1940's and 1950's. Then, he could have described how having "enough" has led to contentment and a lack of desire to get more of everything, which might even break the cycle of growth that has caused so many environmental problems. Instead, as with most economists, he sees growth as key to everything.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Brian Sachetta
  • Brian Sachetta
  • 21-09-21

Was hoping for more

I was drawn in by this one’s title and cover — it seemed like it would be a fun, and possibly even controversial, take on where the country is headed. I’d never heard of the author before, but I was interested enough in the book’s description, so I gave it a shot.

You can never really know what a book is going to be like heading into it, but I do think I should’ve paid a bit more attention to the reviews of this one. They seem to reflect what I found in the end — a narrative that lacked cohesion, emotion, and much of a conclusion.

For most of the audiobook (I listened to this one, btw), I felt like I was hearing the passive reading of a research study’s results — there were loads of statistics, but none of them really linked to a larger narrative or made you feel connected to a central theme.

There were many different topics covered in it as well, but they all seemed somewhat disjointed. I heard a lot about “matching” and “segregation,” two things I didn’t expect when looking at the book’s title, but not enough about complacency. Sure, there’s a little bit of that subject in this one, but not enough.

On a closing note, I’ll say I did notice that some other reviews cited political arguments as the problem with this one. To be honest, I didn’t feel the same way; to me, it didn’t seem politically charged at all. It was just a bit boring.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Jake E.
  • Jake E.
  • 27-06-19

Vague and confusing

Not clear who the complacent class is, why they are complacent or what to do about it. Just a lot of observations and data about how complacency is increasing. I was expecting a lot more... I’ve always liked the authors blog, Marginal Revolution. The book just seems like a long blog post that hasn’t been refined enough. Disappointing

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Judy W.
  • Judy W.
  • 17-05-18

Dense

This book is interesting, and very dense. Plan to listen carefully.

I honestly kinda disliked the book...the tone of the book...until the very last chapter. That's when the whole thing started to make sense to me. Overall, very helpful. But the listener must stick with it.