Listen free for 30 days

Listen with a free trial

One credit a month, good for any title to download and keep.
Unlimited listening to the Plus Catalogue - thousands of select Audible Originals, podcasts and audiobooks.
Exclusive member-only deals.
No commitment - cancel anytime.
Buy Now for £25.99

Buy Now for £25.99

Pay using card ending in
By completing your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and authorise Audible to charge your designated card or any other card on file. Please see our Privacy Notice, Cookies Notice and Interest-based Ads Notice.

Summary

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of The Closed Circle by Jonathan Coe.   

On Millennium night, with Blair presiding over a superficially cool, sexed-up new version of the country, Benjamin Trotter finds himself watching the celebrations on his parents' TV. 

Watching, in fact, his younger brother, Paul, now a bright young New Labour MP who has bought wholeheartedly into the Blairite dream. Neither of them can know that their lives are about to implode.   

Set against the backdrop of a changing Britain and the country's increasingly compromised role in America's 'war against terrorism', the characters struggle to make sense of the perennial problems of love, vocation and family.

©2019 Jonathan Coe (P)2019 Penguin Books Ltd

What listeners say about The Closed Circle

Average customer ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    33
  • 4 Stars
    15
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    30
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    32
  • 4 Stars
    11
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Disappointing reader

A very enjoyable novel that sums up Britain in the Blair years, but somewhat marred by the dull reading. The lack of vocal differentiation between characters made it hard to follow at times, and the reading was occasionally stilted and hesitant. For a book set largely in Birmingham, I would have thought an actor with a local accent more appropriate. Some of the ex-Longbridge workers were made unintentionally comical by the incongruity of their Home Counties accents, but generally I felt the flat reading failed to capture the humour of the book. Disappointing.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Stunning follow on to the Rotters club

Having really liked the Rotter's club I was pleasantly surprised to find this book is even better. The narrative arc it forms with the first book is very clever but it's amazing how much you feel for the characters too. The book is much more than just political commentary. Oh, and the narration is excellent too.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Millennium Madness

A good fun read from Jonathan Coe and a step up from The Rotters Club in terms of quality of writing - or perhaps it was just tighter editing. I am the same age as Coe so found this brought back so many memories, lots of very funny moments and plenty of cringeworthy ones too. Looking forward to listening to the next installment.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

More excellent prose from JC

The sequel to the Rotters' Club is even better in my opinion. Brilliantly read by Nicholas Burns too.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The Rotters Return

Really enjoyed this sequel to The Rotters Club.
Jonathan Coe is great at capturing the feeling and political mood of the New Labour years. It’s great to hear about the local Birmingham and Midland landmarks and references, but also the feelings, the fear and impact of the IRA years, the humour and drama of that period.

The narration is excellent and perfectly matches the content and dialogue.

Brilliant!